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dc.contributor.advisorLichti, Derek
dc.contributor.authorChan, Ting On
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-30T18:48:35Z
dc.date.available2015-02-23T08:00:42Z
dc.date.issued2015-01-30
dc.date.submitted2015en
dc.identifier.citationChan, T. O. (2015). Cylindrical and Polygonal Object Modelling and its use in LiDAR Calibration and Point Cloud Registration (Unpublished doctoral thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/25511en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11023/2049
dc.description.abstractLiDAR systems are optical metrological instruments that capture surfaces of objects as highly redundant sets of discrete points (known as point clouds) in a 3D coordinate system from which spatial information can be extracted to support many applications. The accuracy of the LiDAR measurements can be improved by performing appropriate calibration. In this thesis, two novel cylinder-based calibration methods are presented for recovering interior systematic errors of different types of the LiDAR systems. The first method is a cylinder-based self-calibration technique which primarily uses point clouds of vertical cylindrical features captured from several static scan locations. The method is suitable for LiDAR systems with time-invariant errors. The second calibration method is for multi-beam spinning LiDAR systems. It allows frequent, repeated calibrations to be performed in either static or kinematic scanning mode for recovering the time-varying interior errors. For the calibration in kinematic mode, roadside power and lamp poles are used as the calibration references. In addition to these, a new geometric model of octagonal lamp poles along with a new model-driven point cloud registration method is proposed. The new geometric model uses the rotational symmetry property of the polygon to overcome the challenges of modelling the polygonal periphery using a single equation instead of piecewise functions. The proposed registration method is based on the model and requires only point clouds of a single octagonal lamp pole as registration primitives, and no actual overlap between the point clouds of the pole captured at different scan locations is needed. Each proposed method was individually verified with several real datasets, and most of them were also tested with some simulated datasets. The results suggest that all the proposed methods are practical and also offer improvements compared to the existing methods. The main contribution of this work is that many cylindrical and polygonal objects already exist in the built environment can now be used for sensor calibration, point cloud registration, and some other potential new applications as discussed in the last chapter of this thesis.en_US
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subjectRemote Sensing
dc.subjectOptics
dc.subjectEngineering--Civil
dc.subject.classificationLiDARen_US
dc.subject.classificationPoint Clouden_US
dc.subject.classificationCalibrationen_US
dc.subject.classificationRegistrationen_US
dc.subject.classificationCylinderen_US
dc.subject.classificationPolygonen_US
dc.subject.classificationModellingen_US
dc.subject.classificationGeometricen_US
dc.subject.classificationLeast-squaresen_US
dc.titleCylindrical and Polygonal Object Modelling and its use in LiDAR Calibration and Point Cloud Registration
dc.typedoctoral thesis
dc.publisher.facultyGraduate Studies
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/25511
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.namePhD
thesis.degree.disciplineGeomatics Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
atmire.migration.oldid2954
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.