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dc.contributor.advisorStrack, Maria
dc.contributor.advisorMcDermid, Greg
dc.contributor.authorGarcia Bravo, Tania
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-29T20:14:51Z
dc.date.available2015-06-22T07:00:48Z
dc.date.issued2015-04-29
dc.date.submitted2015en
dc.identifier.citationGarcia Bravo, T. (2015). Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P Plantation on Cutover Peatland in Alberta (Canada): Evaluating the Effect of Fertilization and Resulting Carbon Stocks. (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/27357en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11023/2178
dc.description.abstractHorticultural peat extraction in Canada is mainly performed by vacuum-harvesting, leading to a residual peat soil limited in nutrients and seed bank, which does not allow adequate plant recovery once extraction ceases. Restoration techniques have been designed for the rehabilitation of open bog areas in eastern Canada, but in western Canada many undisturbed peatlands have high cover of forest and the reintroduction of trees should be part of restoration goals. This study is focused on Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P (black spruce) plantation. Previous studies have shown that fertilization is needed, but the adequate dose of fertilizer to create the preferred habitat structures remains unclear. Fertilizer dose could also affect the colonization of non-target species such as Betula papyrifera (March.) and consequently microclimate conditions and competition could affect the growth of P. mariana. Results showed that a low dose of fertilizer (8.9 g/ bag) allowed P. mariana to establish while controlling the B. papyrifera colonization. Higher rates of fertilization resulted in dense B. papyrifera communities having a direct effect on photosynthetically active radiation and relative humidity at ground level. Black spruce plantation on cutover peat will also affect the site’s carbon (C) balance. The C balance was estimated using the C stock in biomass of the forest plantation and soil respiration measurement (CO2 and CH4). Although B. papyrifera fixed C though biomass, they also may influence the site hydrology by higher evapotranspiration. After seven years post-restoration, the study site was a source of C due to dry conditions and lack of understory, resulting in peat oxidation. These results can be used to assist in the choice of suitable treatments when the restoration goal is the recovery of ecological functions in cutover peatlands.en_US
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subjectEngineering--Environmental
dc.subject.classificationPeatland Restorationen_US
dc.subject.classificationFertilizationen_US
dc.subject.classificationCarbon Balanceen_US
dc.subject.classificationBlack spruceen_US
dc.subject.classificationgreenhouse gasesen_US
dc.titlePicea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P Plantation on Cutover Peatland in Alberta (Canada): Evaluating the Effect of Fertilization and Resulting Carbon Stocks.
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.facultyGraduate Studies
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/27357
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
thesis.degree.nameMS
thesis.degree.nameMSc
thesis.degree.disciplineGeography
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
atmire.migration.oldid3147
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen


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