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dc.contributor.advisorSideris, Michael G.
dc.contributor.authorAmjadiparvar, Babak
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-09T19:14:12Z
dc.date.available2015-11-20T08:00:33Z
dc.date.issued2015-07-09
dc.date.submitted2015en
dc.identifier.citationAmjadiparvar, B. (2015). Height Datum Unification with the Boundary Value Problem Approach (Unpublished doctoral thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/26348en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11023/2338
dc.description.abstractTwo levelling-based vertical datums have been used in North America, namely CGVD28 in Canada and NAVD88 in the USA and Mexico. The unification of these levelling-based vertical datums is of great interest to the scientific and user communities. In this thesis, the geodetic boundary value problem (GBVP) approach is studied as a rigorous method for connecting vertical datums through computed datum offsets from a global equipotential surface defined by means of a GOCE-based geoid. The so-called indirect bias term, the effect of the GOCE geoid omission error, the effect of the systematic levelling datum errors and distortions, and the effect of the data errors on the datum unification are four important factors affecting the practical implementation of this approach. These factors are investigated numerically using the GNSS-levelling and tide gauge stations. The results show that the indirect bias term can be omitted if a GOCE-based global geopotential model is used in geoid computation. The omission of the indirect bias term simplifies the linear system of equations for the estimation of the datum offset. Because of the existing systematic levelling errors and distortions in the Canadian and US levelling networks, the datum offsets are investigated in eight smaller regions along the Canadian and US coastal areas. Using GNSS-levelling stations in the US coastal regions, the mean datum offset can be estimated with a 1 cm error if the GOCE geoid omission error is taken into account using local gravity and topographic information. In the Canadian Atlantic and Pacific regions, the datum offsets can be estimated with 2.3 and 3.5 cm uncertainty, respectively, using GNSS-levelling stations. However, due to the very limited number of tide gauge stations, the datum offset error can reach one decimetre in the Pacific regions. With the available GNSS-levelling stations in Alaska and Mexico, the datum offsets can be estimated with less than 3 cm error. The numerical investigations of this study provide, for the first time, the datum offsets between North American vertical datums and their associated errors with which the offsets can be estimated.en_US
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subjectGeodesy
dc.subjectGeophysics
dc.subject.classificationGeodetic boundary value problemen_US
dc.subject.classificationVertical datum unificationen_US
dc.subject.classificationIndirect bias termen_US
dc.subject.classificationGOCEen_US
dc.subject.classificationOmission erroren_US
dc.subject.classificationLevelling networken_US
dc.titleHeight Datum Unification with the Boundary Value Problem Approach
dc.typedoctoral thesis
dc.publisher.facultyGraduate Studies
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/26348
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.namePhD
thesis.degree.disciplineGeomatics Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
atmire.migration.oldid3373
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.