Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorDyck, Richard
dc.contributor.authorChrusch, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-29T15:25:12Z
dc.date.available2015-11-20T08:00:32Z
dc.date.issued2015-07-29
dc.date.submitted2015en
dc.identifier.citationChrusch, M. (2015). The Role of Synaptic Zinc in Experience-Dependent Plasticity (Unpublished doctoral thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/28358en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11023/2369
dc.description.abstractExperience-dependent plasticity is a fundamental component of the brain’s ability to adapt to its environment. An increasing amount of research suggests that synaptic zinc could be an important mediator of plasticity within the brain. Although a role for synaptic zinc in modulating experience-dependent plasticity has been hypothesized, to date no research has determined if synaptic zinc is necessary for experience-dependent plasticity. The goal of this thesis was to determine if synaptic zinc is an important mediator of experience-dependent plasticity within the hippocampus and neocortex. The mechanisms through which the brain can respond to experience differ depending on the area of the brain being examined. For example, the extent of hippocampal neurogenesis can be increased by experiences such as environmental enrichment. Our experiments demonstrate that synaptic zinc is necessary for the enhancement of adult hippocampal neurogenesis by environmental enrichment. GPR39 is a zinc-sensing receptor that might transduce the zinc signal that is ultimately responsible for modulating adult hippocampal neurogenesis. We found that ablation of GPR39 signalling also prevented environmental enrichment-dependent increases in neurogenesis. Together these experiments demonstrate a novel role for synaptic zinc and GPR39 in contributing to experience-dependent plasticity in the hippocampus. Experience can also shape the functioning of the neocortex. Depriving neurons of the primary somatosensory cortex (or barrel cortex) of sensory input by whisker trimming can depress sensory-evoked responses in these neurons. In addition, sensory deprivation can increase the amount of synaptic zinc within sensory deprived regions of the barrel cortex. The regulation of synaptic zinc by sensory experience suggests its mechanistic involvement in experience-dependent plasticity. Utilizing voltage-sensitive dye imaging, which allows for in vivo imaging of sensory-evoked activity in the barrel cortex, we examined sensory deprivation-induced decreases in cortical activity in the barrel cortex. Our results show that ablation of synaptic zinc prevented sensory deprivation-induced reductions in cortical activity. These results demonstrate a role for synaptic zinc for experience-dependent plasticity within the neocortex. Together, this research provides substantive support for a role for synaptic zinc as an essential regulator of experience-dependent plasticity in both the hippocampus and neocortex.en_US
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subjectNeuroscience
dc.subject.classificationsynaptic zincen_US
dc.subject.classificationneurogenesisen_US
dc.subject.classificationexperience-dependent plasticityen_US
dc.subject.classificationZnT3en_US
dc.subject.classificationbarrel cortexen_US
dc.subject.classificationHippocampusen_US
dc.titleThe Role of Synaptic Zinc in Experience-Dependent Plasticity
dc.typedoctoral thesis
dc.publisher.facultyGraduate Studies
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/28358
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.namePhD
thesis.degree.disciplineNeuroscience
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
atmire.migration.oldid3415
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record