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dc.contributor.advisorMarshall, Shawn
dc.contributor.authorAdhikari, Surendra
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-01T18:32:44Z
dc.date.available2012-11-13T08:01:45Z
dc.date.issued2012-10-01
dc.date.submitted2012en
dc.identifier.citationAdhikari, S. (2012). Advances in modelling of valley glaciers (Unpublished doctoral thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/24726en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11023/246
dc.description.abstractFor glaciological conditions typical of valley glaciers, the central idea of this research lies in understanding the effects of high-order mechanics and parameterizing these for simpler dynamical and statistical methods in glaciology. As an effective tool for this, I formulate a new brand of dynamical models that describes distinct physical processes of deformational flow. Through numerical simulations of idealized glacier domains, I calculate empirical correction factors to capture the effects of longitudinal stress gradients and lateral drag for simplified dynamical models in the plane-strain regime. To get some insights into real glacier dynamics, I simulate Haig Glacier in the Canadian Rocky Mountains. As geometric effects overshadow dynamical effects in glacier retreat scenarios, it appears that high-order physics are not very important for Haig Glacier, particularly for evaluating its fate. Indeed, high-order and reduced models all predict that Haig Glacier ceases to exist by about AD 2080 under ongoing climate warming. This finding regarding the minimal role of high-order physics may not be broadly valid, as it is not true in advance scenarios at Haig Glacier and it may not be representative of other glaciological settings. Through a `bulk' parameterization of high-order physics, geometric and climatic settings, sliding conditions, and transient effects, I also provide new insights into the volume-area relation, a widely used statistical method for estimating glacier volume. I find a steady-state power-law exponent of 1.46, which declines systematically to 1.38 after 100 years of sustained retreat, in good accord with the observations. I recommend more accurate scaling relations through characterization of individual glacier morphology and degree of climatic disequilibrium. This motivates a revision of global glacier volume estimates, of some urgency in sea level rise assessments.en_US
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subjectGeophysics
dc.subject.classificationGlaciologyen_US
dc.subject.classificationGlacier dynamicsen_US
dc.titleAdvances in modelling of valley glaciers
dc.typedoctoral thesis
dc.publisher.facultyGraduate Studies
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/24726
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.namePhD
thesis.degree.disciplineGeography
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
atmire.migration.oldid375
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.