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dc.contributor.advisorKawalilak, Colleen
dc.contributor.authorCorcoran, Lynn Ann
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-07T19:01:02Z
dc.date.available2016-03-07T19:01:02Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.date.submitted2016en
dc.identifier.citationCorcoran, L. A. (2016). He Seemed Like Such a Nice Guy: Young Adults' Understandings of Intimate Partner Violence (Unpublished doctoral thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/26353en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11023/2858
dc.description.abstractIntimate partner violence is a serious concern with consequences related to physical, social, and emotional health of individuals, families, and society. Despite extensive research and targeted strategies to address this problem, incidents of intimate partner violence occur while local, provincial, and national agencies track this violence over time. Emerging adults are in a life stage where they are forming beliefs about intimate partner relationships. They are engaged in adult learning that occurs incidentally as they navigate experiences in life, work, and love. As such, they are in a position to contribute to an understanding of the range of intimate partner relationships (healthy, unhealthy, and violent) with the possibility of informing strategies aimed at preventing this violence. In light of the magnitude of the concern of intimate partner violence, I conducted a study using hermeneutics as a philosophy and method to explore how emerging adults understand violence in relationships. Data sources included unstructured interviews with 12 individuals aged 18 to 29 years and media reports of a critical incident of intimate partner violence wherein four young people were shot by an ex-boyfriend of one of the young adults before he shot himself. Findings included: the importance of being connected to friends and not isolating oneself; the existence of sexual pressure and issues of ambiguity regarding consent to sexual activity; the challenge of recognizing violence in relationships and the stigma that goes with labelling it as such; the influence of media reports of intimate partner violence, in particular the use of the rhetoric of he seemed like such a nice guy; the powerful impact that texting has in communication between emerging adults in intimate partner relationships and its connection to stalking and jealousy; and the protective effect of loving family and friends on young people as they navigate intimate partner relationships. Implications of this study include the possibility of multiple strategies for prevention of intimate partner violence situated in adult learning. These strategies include utilizing the voices of emerging adults to reflect the challenge of recognizing and naming violence in relationships to make a powerful impact on cognitive and emotional levels.en_US
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subjectEducation--Adult and Continuing
dc.titleHe Seemed Like Such a Nice Guy: Young Adults' Understandings of Intimate Partner Violence
dc.typedoctoral thesis
dc.publisher.facultyGraduate Studies
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/26353
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.namePhD
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Research
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
atmire.migration.oldid4191
dc.contributor.committeememberBohac-Clarke, Veronika
dc.contributor.committeememberMoules, Nancy
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCaffrey, Graham
dc.contributor.committeememberCharles, Grant
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen


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