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dc.contributor.advisorPerreault, Jeanne
dc.contributor.authorHubbard, Tasha
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-07T17:04:10Z
dc.date.available2016-09-07T17:04:10Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.date.submitted2016en
dc.identifier.citationHubbard, T. (2016). The Call of the Buffalo: Exploring Kinship with the Buffalo in Indigenous Creative Expression (Unpublished doctoral thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/28021en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11023/3272
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines the kinship relationship between Indigenous peoples and our relative the buffalo. I posit that texts in which Indigenous peoples express their relationship with the buffalo contain expressions of Indigenous epistemologies. Indigenous kinship theory, Indigenous critical geography, and Indigenous histories are foundational for this project. The presence of the buffalo is found within Indigenous oral stories, literature, art, and other forms of expression. Specifically, the dissertation engages with the representation of buffalo’s role in creating and renewing kinship ties. It examines Indigenous grief and mourning during the genocide of the buffalo; buffalo confinement and diaspora during the settlement era; women’s knowledge of the connection between buffalo and the land; and the artist’s role in revitalizing the relationship with buffalo. Authors and creators include Percy Bullchild, Alexander Wolfe, Edward Benton-Banai, Leslie Marmon Silko, Stan Cuthand, Barry Ahenakew, Neal McLeod, Marilyn Dumont, Louise Erdrich, Mourning Dove, D’Arcy McNickle, Linda Hogan, Beverly Hungry Wolf, Beth Cuthand, Louise Halfe, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, Adrian Stimson and Thomas King. This work can be understood as the imperative for Indigenous peoples to remember the kinship relationship shared with the buffalo, including the web of responsibilities to all peoples, human and more-than-human, with whom we share this land.en_US
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subjectLiterature
dc.subject.classificationIndigenousen_US
dc.titleThe Call of the Buffalo: Exploring Kinship with the Buffalo in Indigenous Creative Expression
dc.typedoctoral thesis
dc.publisher.facultyGraduate Studies
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/28021
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.namePhD
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglish
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
atmire.migration.oldid4862
dc.contributor.committeememberJustice, Daniel Heath
dc.contributor.committeememberDevine, Heather
dc.contributor.committeememberKertzer, Adrienne
dc.contributor.committeememberBanting, Pamela
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.