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dc.contributor.advisorTrang, Tuan
dc.contributor.authorXu, Yang
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-09T15:47:30Z
dc.date.available2017-06-09T15:47:30Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.date.submitted2017en
dc.identifier.citationXu, Y. (2017). The Role of A3 Adenosine Receptors in Opioid Analgesic Tolerance (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/28315en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11023/3877
dc.description.abstractOpioids, such as morphine, are potent analgesic drugs that are commonly used to treat moderate to severe acute pain. There is also increasing reliance on opioids for managing chronic pain, a pervasive condition that afflicts approximately one in five Canadians. However, prolonged opioid usage can lead to the development of opioid analgesic tolerance, which is characterized by diminished pain-relieving effects. The A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) is a novel target that produces antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects in animal models of chronic neuropathic pain, a condition that shares similar mechanisms with opioid tolerance. We determined that spinal A3AR acutely potentiates morphine antinociception without preventing the development of tolerance. Chronic morphine increased microglia reactivity, MAP kinase activity within the lumbar spinal cord, and cell-surface A3AR protein density on microglia, while spinal A3AR activation abrogated these changes. Overall, these findings have significant implications for improving opioid efficacy in chronic pain management.en_US
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subjectNeuroscience
dc.titleThe Role of A3 Adenosine Receptors in Opioid Analgesic Tolerance
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.facultyGraduate Studies
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/28315
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
thesis.degree.nameMS
thesis.degree.nameMSc
thesis.degree.disciplineNeuroscience
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
atmire.migration.oldid5680
dc.contributor.committeememberAltier, Christophe
dc.contributor.committeememberThompson, Roger
dc.contributor.committeememberWilson, Richard
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue


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