Recent Submissions

  • Calgary Working Papers in Linguistics, Volume 1, Winter 1975 

    Klokeid, Terry J.; Roberts, Linda; Cook, Eung-Do; Stewart, Charlotte; Hofer, Earl (University of Calgary, Arts, Linguistics, University of Calgary, 1975-01)
    The ten papers presented in this first issue share the theme of the phonology of Canadian English. The authors were students in an undergraduate course on the history of English, winter term 1974. Some, but not all of the ...
  • Vowel shortening and T-voicing in Canadian English 

    Campbell, A. Luella (University of Calgary, Arts, Linguistics, University of Calgary, 1975-01)
    This paper will discuss three regional variations in Canadian dialects. Two of these regions have two rules, which do not seem to be present in the third dialect, Dialect C. These two rules differ in their ordering in the ...
  • A comparison of New Brunswick and Saskatchewan English 

    Gordon, Barbara; Stevens, Anita (University of Calgary, Arts, Linguistics, University of Calgary, 1975-01)
    This paper deals with the phonological differences of three dialects within two provinces in Canada. One dialect recorded was that from a region in New Brunswick, while the other two dialects were from different areas in ...
  • A comparison of M. Bloomfield's "Western (Saskatchewan)" dialect and a dialect from the Regina area 

    Gullon, P (University of Calgary, Arts, Linguistics, University of Calgary, 1975-01)
    Bloomfield, in Southerland: (1973:31-32) presents a phonetic transcription for several dozen words in the "Western (Saskatchewan)" dialect of English. An analysis of this regional dialect shows a number of rather faulty ...
  • Rule ordering in Canadian English 

    Jones, Brenda (University of Calgary, Arts, Linguistics, University of Calgary, 1975-01)
    Over ten years ago, "Morris Halle cited Martin Joos' data to demonstrate that some Canadian dialect differences can be characterized in terms of differently ordered rules." Two of these differently ordered rules are T-Voicing ...
  • The glottal closure sound in English 

    Kemp, Leanne (University of Calgary, Arts, Linguistics, University of Calgary, 1975-01)
    In the Alberta dialect of English, there are three environments which will affect the pronuncation of the /t/ phoneme. While these pronunciations may be found to be widespread, their employment is optional and may vary on ...
  • G-deletion in Canadian dialects of English 

    Murray, Brenda (University of Calgary, Arts, Linguistics, University of Calgary, 1975-01)
    Dialects differ in many ways. Canadian dialects differ among themselves. An example of this is in the presence or absence of a rule.
  • An introduction to: trisyllabic laxing, vowel shift, and Canadian raising 

    Rempel, Rosemary (University of Calgary, Arts, Linguistics, University of Calgary, 1975-01)
    In our English language we have a number of words that we know are somehow the same and yet we pronounce them very differently. Let's take a look at the phonetic form of some of these words, in particular, certain vowel sounds.
  • The relevance of morpheme boundaries to nasal assimilation in Canadian English 

    Roth, Ruth (University of Calgary, Arts, Linguistics, University of Calgary, 1975-01)
    Consider the words sink, blunt, frank, single, uncle and wind; all of which contain the phoneme /n/. Note that lint, blunt and wind differ from the others in the pronunciation of /n/. Sink, frank, single, and uncle all ...
  • Canadian Raising in a Windsor, Ontario dialect 

    Weber, Debby (University of Calgary, Arts, Linguistics, University of Calgary, 1975-01)
    There is a rule found in most if not all Canadian Dialects in which the diphthongs /aw/ and /ay/ are heightened under varied conditions to produce [ʌw] and [ʌy]: this rule has been called Canadian Raising. Let us first ...

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