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dc.contributor.advisorRoessingh, Hetty
dc.contributor.authorKilani, Hoda
dc.date2018-11
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-05T18:13:03Z
dc.date.available2018-10-05T18:13:03Z
dc.date.issued2018-09
dc.identifier.citationKilani, H. (2018). Exploring the Linguistic Profile of Gifted ESL Students (Unpublished doctoral thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/33121en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/108769
dc.description.abstractThis study gleaned insights into the linguistic profile of gifted English as second language students (ESL). It explored students’, parents’, and teachers’ views of the gifted ESL journey of linguistic development through discussions on vocabulary development strategies, personal traits, and socio-cultural influences. Exploration used a single case study and gave voice to a purposive sample of four students, two parents, and three teachers. Data consisted of Expressive One-Word Picture Vocabulary Test (Martin, & Brownell, 2016), background survey, Duckworth’s 12-Item Grit Scale (2016b), Oxford’s Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (1990), focus groups with all participant groups, and interviews with students. The setting was a K-12 school where students (a) were enrolled in the same school, (b) were predominantly taught in English, (c) arrived to school with knowledge of a language other than English, (d) identified by the school as gifted and ESL, and (e) were in Grade 8 or 9. Students’ profiles showed that developing academic language is important for school success and should not be limited to determining efficacious linguistic strategies as it is also connected to interest and motivation. Parents’ and teachers’ data confirmed students’ results. Findings suggested that the ‘good’ gifted language learner consciously deploys (a) linguistic strategies, (b) personal traits, and (c) socio-cultural influences for linguistic development. The study proposed a vocabulary development model that classroom practitioners can adopt and adapt. The purpose is to initiate discussions and invite new research on pedagogies that enable academic vocabulary expansion among gifted ESL students.en_US
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subjectEnglish as a second language (ESL)
dc.subjectgiftedness
dc.subjectpersonal traits
dc.subjectsocio-cultural influences
dc.subjectvocabulary development
dc.subject.classificationEducation--Bilingual and Multiculturalen_US
dc.subject.classificationEducation--Curriculum and Instructionen_US
dc.subject.classificationEducational Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.classificationEducation--Guidance and Counselingen_US
dc.subject.classificationEducation--Language and Literatureen_US
dc.subject.classificationEducation--Specialen_US
dc.titleExploring the Linguistic Profile of Gifted ESL Students
dc.typedoctoral thesis
dc.publisher.facultyGraduate Studies
dc.publisher.facultyWerklund School of Education
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/33121
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Education
thesis.degree.nameEdD
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguages, Literatures and Cultures
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.contributor.committeememberMendaglio, Sal
dc.contributor.committeememberRoy, Sylvie
dc.contributor.committeememberO'Brien, Mary Grantham
dc.contributor.committeememberAbbott, Marilyn L.
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.