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dc.contributor.advisorHawkins, Richard W.
dc.contributor.authorop'tLand, Raymond Michael
dc.date2020-06
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-04T19:37:31Z
dc.date.available2019-11-04T19:37:31Z
dc.date.issued2019-10-31
dc.identifier.citationop'tLand, R. M. (2019). Makers in the Workshop (Unpublished doctoral thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/111198
dc.description.abstractMakerspaces have grown as sites of innovation since the turn of the 21st-century, but the processes and methods by which they have directly contributed to innovation have been underexplored. Makerspaces exist as communal hi-tech workshops that draw on networks of knowledge in order to create their community, and they live and die by this community as well. Building on literature on both innovation and communication, this dissertation will examine the communities at three specific makerspaces in the Calgary area, and ethnographic fieldwork and participant observation will inform the rich text that serves as the data for the case study approach. By examining the development process at makerspaces, this research asks 1) how are the ideas and inspirations for the development of a new technology transferred between developers and their collaborators, 2) what sources of inspiration and new knowledge do the developers use for both the subjective and functional components of their design, and finally 3) what is the role of the makerspace as a third place where developers can collaborate and share ideas during the development process? This research contributes in three areas: 1) it informs current theories on innovation on the processes that involve subjective elements in the process of innovation; 2) it advances the literature on makerspaces and their communication processes, especially their study in Canada, and 3) it initiates and advocates for the development of a critical maker studies, as a counterpart to much of the literature in the area published to date.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.en_US
dc.subjectinnovationen_US
dc.subjectmakerspacesen_US
dc.subjectcritical maker studiesen_US
dc.subjectinventionen_US
dc.subjectethnographyen_US
dc.subjectcommunicationen_US
dc.subject.classificationEducation--Technologyen_US
dc.titleMakers in the Workshopen_US
dc.typedoctoral thesisen_US
dc.publisher.facultyArtsen_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunication and Media Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgaryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDavis, Charles H.
dc.contributor.committeememberSmart, Alan
dc.contributor.committeememberParker, James R.
dc.contributor.committeememberKeough, Noel
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrueen_US


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.