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dc.contributor.advisorMitchell, David
dc.contributor.authorChiang, Angela
dc.date2020-06
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-06T15:44:59Z
dc.date.available2019-11-06T15:44:59Z
dc.date.issued2019-10-31
dc.identifier.citationChiang, A. (2019). How do You Watch? Defining Audience in the Era of Internet-Mediated Television (Unpublished doctoral thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/111200
dc.description.abstractTelevision content and its consumption have experienced radical changes since the turn of the century which have yet to be systematically explored and theorized. As we head into this new era of television, study of this rapidly evolving audience begs continued research and a repositioning in a new context. The claim that the present-day audience is more interactive than in eras past has surfaced as one of the defining topics in the current literature, namely due to the prevalence of social media and the production of tangible markers of spectatorship that can be accessed and analyzed online. Discussed as a ‘highly participatory viewer’, the visible viewing practices posted online have come from a fairly influential portion of the television audience, however the focus on this particular group’s habits cannot be generalizable to the audience as a whole. ‘Interactivity’ is therefore best conceptualized not in monolithic terms, but as a concept that encompasses a spectrum of activities, from the interpretative to the physical actions of the viewers. A redefinition of the viewer in the age of internet-mediated television is needed, one that encompasses these activities, which may be more commonplace and less ground-breaking and that may not be readily observed online. This project explores the patterns of television spectatorship in a digital age, examining the multidimensional link between the widespread use of the internet and its surrounding technologies, the relationship between the findings of audience reception studies of the past and the psychology behind the motivations of television viewing. Through discussion with self-identified television viewers, the findings in this research indicate that television consumption is invariably linked to online access and online practices, the viewer appears to exercise additional agency in comparison to eras past, and that ultimately, internet-mediated television research must account for offline practices of viewing in addition to online to garner a truly representative understanding of the audience of the current age. This study was designed in the hopes that the behaviours identified would provide insight into the makeup of media consumption in a digital era, and perhaps the notion of how the influence of leisure may be manifested in other social arenas.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.en_US
dc.subjecttelevisionen_US
dc.subjectaudienceen_US
dc.subjectinternet-mediateden_US
dc.subject.classificationMass Communicationsen_US
dc.titleHow do You Watch? Defining Audience in the Era of Internet-Mediated Televisionen_US
dc.typedoctoral thesisen_US
dc.publisher.facultyArtsen_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunication and Media Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgaryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJohnston, Dawn Elizabeth B.
dc.contributor.committeememberLeblanc, Jean Rene
dc.contributor.committeememberShepherd, Tamara
dc.contributor.committeememberTinic, Serra A.
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrueen_US


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.