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dc.contributor.authorParé, Dylan
dc.contributor.authorSengupta, Pratim
dc.contributor.authorWindsor, Scout
dc.contributor.authorCraig, John
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Matthew
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-03T15:27:42Z
dc.date.available2020-03-03T15:27:42Z
dc.date.issued2019-01
dc.identifier.citationParé, D., Sengupta, P., Windsor, S., John, C., & Thompson, M. (2019). Queering Virtual Reality. In Critical, Transdisciplinary and Embodied Approaches in STEM Education (pp. 307–328). Cham, Switzerland: Springer. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-29489-2_17en_US
dc.identifier.isbn978-3-030-29488-5
dc.identifier.isbn978-3-030-29489-2
dc.identifier.issn2520-8616
dc.identifier.issn2520-8624
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/111707
dc.description.abstractIn this chapter, we investigate how innovations in STEM, such as Virtual Reality (VR) and 3D Sculpting, can support the development of critical literacies about gender and sexuality. Our work arises from the concern that the assumed \naturalness" of male/female binary categories in biol- ogy is often at the center of the queer, trans, and intersex panics in public education. Echoing sociologists and critical scholars of gender and sexu- ality, we posit that transgender and queer identities should be positioned as realms of playful, active inquiry. Further, we investigate how new forms of computational representational infrastructures can be leveraged to support productive and playful experiences of inquiry about gender and sexuality. We present a retrospective analysis of a design group meeting of a small group of friends in their early thirties with gender nonconforming and queer identities and life histories. The group interacted in VR-based environments, where they engaged in two di erent forms of construction- ist learning experiences: creating 3D sculptures of personally meaningful objects, and re-creating their VR avatars in VR social media. Our analysis illustrates how such experiences can be productively analyzed using so- cial constructivist perspectives that situate knowing as boundary play and gured worlds, and the roles that play and friendship have in supporting deep and critical engagement with complex narratives and marginalizeden_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.rightsUnless otherwise indicated, this material is protected by copyright and has been made available with authorization from the copyright owner. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.en_US
dc.subjectVirtual realityen_US
dc.subjectGenderen_US
dc.subjectSexualityen_US
dc.subjectFigured worldsen_US
dc.subjectLGBTQen_US
dc.titleQueering Virtual Reality: A Prolegomenonen_US
dc.publisher.facultyWerklund School of Educationen_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-29489-2_17en_US
dc.publisher.policyhttps://www.springernature.com/gp/policies/publishing-policiesen_US
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrueen_US
ucalgary.contact.emaildylan.pare@ucalgary.caen_US
ucalgary.contact.nameParé, Dylan


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Unless otherwise indicated, this material is protected by copyright and has been made available with authorization from the copyright owner. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.