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dc.contributor.advisorCulos-Reed, Nicole
dc.contributor.authorEllis, Kelsey
dc.date2021-11
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-21T19:45:16Z
dc.date.available2021-07-21T19:45:16Z
dc.date.issued2021-07-12
dc.identifier.citationEllis, K. (2021). Yoga for Children and Adolescents Affected by Cancer or Blood Disease (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/113658
dc.description.abstractChildren and adolescents (≤18 years of age) affected by cancer or blood disease face significant negative effects due to their disease and treatments. Yoga is one strategy that has been highlighted as safe, feasible, and potentially beneficial in experimental studies for this population. However, significant gaps and limitations exist in the current evidence and practice. First, efforts to collate a growing body of experimental evidence reporting on the effects of yoga are scarce, leaving the breadth of available evidence, the possible effects of yoga, and gaps and limitations in the evidence unknown. Second, despite the potential benefits of yoga, there are relatively few programs being delivered. Moving evidence to practice may be fostered by gathering feedback from key stakeholders, including the yoga instructors - who play a critical role in the safe and effective delivery of these programs. Therefore, the studies comprising this thesis sought to lay a foundation for future research and practice by summarizing the evidence to date reporting on the effects of yoga, and exploring yoga instructors’ lived experiences preparing for and facilitating yoga, for children and adolescents affected by cancer or blood disease. First, a systematic review was conducted wherein eight electronic databases and one trial registry were searched for experimental articles reporting on the effects of yoga for children and adolescents affected by cancer or blood disease. Results were summarized narratively. Across the eleven included studies, wide variability in the literature exists, and while yoga may promote benefits, several limitations in the current evidence were identified. Second, an interpretive description study was conducted via semi-structured interviews with fourteen yoga instructors who had experience facilitating yoga for this population. Data were analyzed using principles of interpretive description and thematic analysis. Findings from this interpretive description study highlight limitations in the yoga instructor training, and the necessity of prioritizing safe, effective, and accessible yoga delivery. Collectively, the studies in this thesis offer important foundational research and practical information, support the continued study and use of yoga as a supportive care resource for children and adolescents affected by cancer or blood disease.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.en_US
dc.subjectchildhooden_US
dc.subjectcanceren_US
dc.subjecthematologyen_US
dc.subjectyogaen_US
dc.subject.classificationEducation--Healthen_US
dc.subject.classificationEducation--Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.classificationOncologyen_US
dc.titleYoga for Children and Adolescents Affected by Cancer or Blood Diseaseen_US
dc.typemaster thesisen_US
dc.publisher.facultyScienceen_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (MSc)en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineKinesiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgaryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSung, Lillian
dc.contributor.committeememberSchulte, Fiona
dc.contributor.committeememberWurz, Amanda
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrueen_US


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.