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dc.contributor.advisorHansen, Dave
dc.contributor.authorVanden Broek, Kara Dawn
dc.date2021-11
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-21T21:14:32Z
dc.date.available2021-07-21T21:14:32Z
dc.date.issued2021-07-21
dc.identifier.citationVanden Broek, K. D. (2021). Investigating the role of RACK-1 in the C. elegans germ line (Unpublished doctoral thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/113659
dc.description.abstractStem cells are central to the development of multi-cellular organisms, including C. elegans and humans. Key to their function is their ability to differentiate into more specialized cells or proliferate to maintain their population for future use. Germline stem cells (GSCs) are a class of stem cells that are crucial for an organism’s reproductive success. GSCs proliferate to maintain the stem cell pool (self-renew) and differentiate to produce gametes (sperm/oocytes). A balance between proliferation and differentiation is necessary for proper germline function and the production of offspring throughout an organism’s life. This thesis uses the C. elegans hermaphrodite germline as an in vivo model to investigate the molecular mechanisms that regulate the proliferation/differentiation balance. In this thesis I have characterized RACK-1 as a modulator of the stem cell proliferation/differentiation balance. I found that RACK-1 is required for the proper activity of the conserved STAR family, RNA-binding protein, GLD-1/Quaking. GLD-1 is expressed throughout the cytoplasm in wildtype germlines, whereas in the absence of rack-1, GLD-1 levels are reduced, and GLD-1 becomes mislocalized to perinuclear aggregates (germ granules). This leads to a decrease, but not a complete loss, of GLD-1 activity. Specifically, a loss of rack-1 in combination with a loss of GLD-2 pathway function results in an over-proliferation phenotype. This phenocopies a partial reduction of gld-1 (gld-1(het)), but not a complete loss of gld-1, in the same genetic background. Additionally, loss of rack-1 rescues the proliferation defects in an fbf-1(0) fbf-2(0) mutant background similar to a reduction of gld-1 (gld-1(het)). Loss of rack-1 enhances the defective progression through meiosis phenotype associated with reduced GLD-1 activity. This data supports the model that rack-1 functions to modulate GLD-1 activity through controlling GLD-1’s subcellular localization and levels, thereby maintaining the proper proliferation/differentiation balance. This thesis reveals a novel mechanism that fine-tunes the activity of a key meiotic protein, GLD-1, to provide an additional layer of regulation in the proliferation/differentiation balance in the C. elegans germlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.en_US
dc.subjectC. elegansen_US
dc.subjectGermlineen_US
dc.subjectStem cellsen_US
dc.subjectGLD-1en_US
dc.subjectRACK-1en_US
dc.subjectDevelopmental Biologyen_US
dc.subjectGeneticsen_US
dc.subject.classificationBiologyen_US
dc.subject.classificationBiology--Cellen_US
dc.subject.classificationGeneticsen_US
dc.subject.classificationBiology--Molecularen_US
dc.titleInvestigating the role of RACK-1 in the C. elegans germ lineen_US
dc.typedoctoral thesisen_US
dc.publisher.facultyScienceen_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiological Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgaryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHuang, Peng
dc.contributor.committeememberSamuel, Marcus
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrueen_US


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.