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dc.contributor.advisorAnderson, James M.
dc.contributor.authorHitch, Doug
dc.coverage.spatial2000001116en
dc.date.accessioned2005-07-21T19:58:39Z
dc.date.available2005-07-21T19:58:39Z
dc.date.issued1981
dc.identifier.citationHitch, D. (1981). Central Asian Brahmi palaeography: the relationships among the Tocharian, Khotanese, and old Turkic Gupta scripts (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/16185en_US
dc.identifier.otherNL Number: 55358en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/22218
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 154-159.en
dc.description.abstractIt has been assumed that Tocharian and Khotanese Brahmi writing were not related and that both systems arose through Indian missionary activity. But since the Central Asians had been Buddhist for at least 500 years, it is here maintained that the introduction and transmission of the Brahmi were strictly indigenous developments. It is suggested that two cultural events happening in India influenced the Khotanese to relinquish Kharosthi script and the Gandhari Prakrit .. as the media of administration and religion: the supercedence of the Kharo??ihI by the Brahmi, and the evolution of a hybrid form of Sanskrit as the lingua franca of Buddhism. In order to prove and illustrate the relationships among the Central Asian Brahmi scripts, use is made not only of character morphology but also of orthographic principles. An examination of the Turkic Brahmi reveals it to have been the intermediary between the Khotanese Formal and the Tocharian Slanting Gupta.. The dual function of the diaeresis in Tocharian as vowel and virama marking is shown to be the result of immitation of the Turks. Similarly, the parallel dual function of the Tocharian 'doublets' as vowel and virama indicators is also demonstrated as having had a Turkic (and Khotanese) origin.
dc.format.extentxii, 159 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subject.lccPK 119 H56 1981 Ficheen
dc.subject.lcshIndo-Aryan languages - Writing
dc.subject.lcshBrahmi alphabet
dc.subject.lcshTokarian language
dc.subject.lcshKhotanese language
dc.titleCentral Asian Brahmi palaeography: the relationships among the Tocharian, Khotanese, and old Turkic Gupta scripts
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/16185
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (MA)
thesis.degree.disciplineLinguistics
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccPK 119 H56 1981 Ficheen
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesUARCen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleasenoen
ucalgary.item.requestcopyTRUE
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 412 82483936


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.