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dc.contributor.advisorBercuson, David Jay
dc.contributor.authorKooyman, Susan M.
dc.coverage.spatial200000339en
dc.date.accessioned2005-07-21T20:00:11Z
dc.date.available2005-07-21T20:00:11Z
dc.date.issued1981
dc.identifier.citationKooyman, S. M. (1981). The policies and legislation of the United Farmers of Alberta government, 1921 - 1935 (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/17179en_US
dc.identifier.otherNL Number: 52398en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/22252
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 140-144.en
dc.description.abstractIn 1921, at the height of the farmers' revolt, the United -Farmers of Alberta government came to power in Alberta. Although elected as farmers to represent farmers, the members of the UFA caucus shared a wide variety of business and professional experience. For a majority of its time in office the government was led by a corporate lawyer. The government was concerned with more than just agrarian interests, and contrary to what might have been expected from a party spawned by the UFA organization, its record was neither progressive nor particularly innovative. During its first term in office the government cancelled relief programmes, rejected demands for monetary reforms, and only reluctantly took a role in the development of railways in the province. At the same time it fully promoted efforts by farmers to help themselves through cooperative marketing. During its second term the government sold the provincial railways, and allowed private industry to develop hydro-electric power in the province. It also showed its reluctance to expand its role in the social welfare field. It delayed opting into the federal old age pension scheme and refused to institute unemployment insurance or a provincial health insurance scheme. The UFA government continued its policy of nonintervention during its last years in power. It relinquished ownership of the rural telephone system in favour of cooperative companies; and it delayed implementing depression relief programmes. It dismissed social credit as another impractical monetary reform scheme. In 1935, after fourteen years in office, the UFA government was defeated by the Social Credit League which had promised to ease depression conditions.
dc.format.extentvi, 144 leaves ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subject.lccFC 3673.2 K64 1981 Ficheen
dc.subject.lcshAlberta - Politics and government
dc.subject.lcshUnited Farmers of Alberta
dc.subject.lcshAgriculture - Alberta - History
dc.titleThe policies and legislation of the United Farmers of Alberta government, 1921 - 1935
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/17179
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.nameMA
thesis.degree.disciplineHistory
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccFC 3673.2 K64 1981 Ficheen
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesUARCen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleasenoen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 416 82483940


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.