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dc.contributor.advisorChorny, Merron
dc.contributor.authorTer Borg, Linda G. (Linda Gaye), 1945-
dc.coverage.spatial20000062en
dc.date.accessioned2005-07-21T20:34:18Z
dc.date.available2005-07-21T20:34:18Z
dc.date.issued1983
dc.identifier.citationTer Borg, L. G. (1983). The Heuristic function of language (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/11741en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0315263768en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/22883
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 155-161.en
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE The power of talk and writing to initiate, shape, refine and extend ideas is only beginning to be understood. This study explored the heuristic functioning of language with the aim of recognizing some of the elements of the process and their relationship. THE STUDY The spoken and written discourse of four adolescent girls engaged in group discussion and individual writing in response to a structured situation was examined and anlyzed. The situation, combining a topical issue -the status of women throughout history -with an art form, had the potential for discovery of both ideas and language. Within this context talk was recorded during five audiotaped sessions, and one video-taped session, and writing was collected in journals, and written projects. Particular attention was focused on the girls' personal constructs of reality, their concepts of self as writer and talker, their attitudes, and their relationships with one another as they formulated intention to deal with the situation. FINDINGS The cognitive and affective operate contiguously throughout the formulation of intention, and throughout the development of our construct systems as we act, react and interact with the world both nonverbally and through language to communicate and to discover. Interlocutors moved easily between participant and spectator role, using a variety of exploratory patterns. Requisite to these patterns were prior knowledge, emotional response, and intention formulation. Writing was found to operate for discovery as well as for communi-cation especially in spectator role. It was influenced by talk and previous writing, and it influenced ensuing talk. When writing functioned heuristically, it was used seriously, and playfully to get in touch with feeling, to imaginatively explore possibilities, to reflect, and to organize ideas. In addition, emotional commitment to intention, formal operational thinking, and pleasure in manipulating language was found. Nonverbals used by interlocutors were found to contribute significantly to understanding. The dimensions of the heuristic function of language include: intention; personal construct systems; indwelling and tacit knowledge; and, cognitive and affective memory, which interact within the context apprehended by the individual. IMPLICATIONS Expressive talk and writing are important learning tools because they can function heuristically. As teachers, we must provide opportunities for students to talk and write to discover, as well as to communicate. In addition, because the cognitive and the affective operate contiguously, both must be considered in our educational planning.
dc.format.extentxii, 185 leaves ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subject.lccLB 1631 T45 1986en
dc.subject.lcshEnglish language - Writing
dc.subject.lcshConversation - Discussion
dc.subject.lcshHeuristic
dc.titleThe Heuristic function of language
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/11741
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.nameMA
thesis.degree.disciplineCurriculum and Instruction
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccLB 1631 T45 1986en
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesUARCen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleasenoen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.