Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMoore, R. Gordon
dc.contributor.authorSibbald, Laurie R. (Laurie Roy), 1959-
dc.date.accessioned2005-07-21T21:49:20Z
dc.date.available2005-07-21T21:49:20Z
dc.date.issued1987
dc.identifier.citationSibbald, L. R. (1987). A Theoretically supported experimental study of in situ combustion (Unpublished doctoral thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/22071en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0315380772en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/23859
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 245-250.en
dc.description.abstractThe in situ combustion process for the recovery of crude petroleum from underground reservoirs is highly complex. Even on an elemental scale its analysis requires physical simulation of realistic reservoir conditions in order to expose its characteristic, but system-specific, relationships. physical and chemical reaction mechanism In the continuing effort to develop experimental systems for the elemental physical simulation of the combustion process, a new combustion tube system was designed, constructed and successfully tested. The system incorporates a novel combination of: an unconsolidated or consolidated core material use capability; the ability to employ high net external pressures while using a thin wall combustion tube; and the use of a modular design with respect to system components . An experimental program undertaken with the newly developed apparatus included isothermal reaction regime tests, supplementary flow characteristic tests, and an air combustion test series in the 4 MPa to 8 MPa pressure range using different crude oils and core material elements. The series was mechanistic in nature, with the goal being the revelation of the effects of specific experimental condition changes on the performance of combustion propagation. In addition to generating data from observed stable combustion processes, the experimental program revealed that a lower porosity consolidated core element required a greater injected air flux to allow process self-sustenance compared to an otherwise equivalent higher porosity unconsolidated material pack. A novel descriptive model of the high temperature (300°C+) region that uses combustion tube experimental data was developed. Applied to the experimental program stable run periods it revealed relationships among parameters including temperature, fuel quantity, oxygen partial pressure, gas volume flux, gas density , local heat generation rate , and distance with respect to the relatively small moving combustion region. The model application indicated that oxygen consumption was not confined to the highest temperature regions of the stable combustion process. It also gave insight into the experimentally observed flux/porosity - consolidation effect on combustion performance observed in the experimental program.
dc.format.extentxx, 263 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subject.lccTN 871 S523 1988en
dc.subject.lcshThermal oil recovery
dc.subject.lcshCombustion research
dc.subject.lcshPetroleum engineering
dc.titleA Theoretically supported experimental study of in situ combustion
dc.typedoctoral thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/22071
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.namePhD
thesis.degree.disciplineChemical and Petroleum Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccTN 871 S523 1988en
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesoffsiteen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 637 520541963


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Embargoed until: 2200-01-01

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.