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dc.contributor.advisorSmith, Derald G.
dc.contributor.authorVanderburgh, Sandy
dc.coverage.spatial2000001664en
dc.date.accessioned2005-07-21T21:52:15Z
dc.date.available2005-07-21T21:52:15Z
dc.date.issued1987
dc.identifier.citationVanderburgh, S. (1987). Geomorphology and sedimentology of the Holocene Slave River delta, Northwest Territories (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/20454en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0315380802en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/23891
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 65-68.en
dc.description.abstractThe Slave River Delta (8,300 km2) is a long (170 km), narrow ( 42 km) alluvial plain which extends north from the Slave River Rapids at Fort Smith to the Great Slave Lake. The delta plain is flanked by the Talston River, Tethul River and Canadian Shield to the east and Little Buffalo River to the west. Analysis of 36 litho-stratigraphic logs from river cutbanks indicate a sandy wave-influenced delta inferred from the dominance of wave-associated sedimentary structures in the middle, upper shoreface and beach deposits. The cutbank exposures terminate approximately 235 km downriver from Fort Smith where mud dominates much of the surficial sediment. Receiving basin morphology, water depth and termination of rebound in the region appears to be accountable for the transition. Radiocarbon analysis of 11 wood samples from river cutbanks and a paleoshoreline reconstruction indicate that the delta prograded at an average rate of 20.76 metres per year from 8,070 to the present. A tilt rate of 21.2 cm/km due to isostatic rebound, normal to the retreating ice margin, has been calculated for the Slave Delta region. The subaqueous delta front exhibits several unique morphologic features including barrier islands, offshore bars, tensional cracks, subaqueous slumps and pressure ridges at 59 m lake depth. The barriers and off shore bars consist of medium sand while the slumps and pressure ridges are interpreted to be of mud.
dc.format.extentx, 68 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relationAdditional Copy: GB 428.5 C2 V36 1987en
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subject.lccGB 428.5 C2 V36 1987aen
dc.subject.lcshGeomorphology - Slave River (Alta. and N.W.T.)
dc.subject.lcshSedimentation and deposition - Slave River (Alta. and N.W.T.)
dc.subject.lcshDeltas - Northwest Territories
dc.subject.lcshGeology - Slave River (Alta. and N.W.T.)
dc.subject.lcshGeology, Stratigraphic - Holocene
dc.titleGeomorphology and sedimentology of the Holocene Slave River delta, Northwest Territories
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/20454
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
thesis.degree.nameMS
thesis.degree.nameMSc
thesis.degree.disciplineGeography
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccGB 428.5 C2 V36 1987aen
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesoffsiteen
ucalgary.thesis.additionalcopyGB 428.5 C2 V36 1987en
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.