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dc.contributor.advisorDoolittle, Joyce
dc.contributor.authorColmers, Eva M.
dc.coverage.spatial200000103en
dc.date.accessioned2005-07-21T21:56:09Z
dc.date.available2005-07-21T21:56:09Z
dc.date.issued1986
dc.identifier.citationColmers, E. M. (1986). Towards a place for shadow play in creative drama (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/12914en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0315327030en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/23933
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 118-123.en
dc.description.abstractShadow theatre is an ancient dramatic art form which has deep roots in most Asian cultures but is relatively foreign to the West. This study intends to inform the reader about the development and styles of shadow theatre and explore its potential for Creative Drama work with children. A look at the development of shadow theatre reveals its religious origin. Because cultures of the East are strongly drawn to the world of the spirits, shadow theatre has a keen appeal there. Although shadow theatre of various countries share the same basic elements (a screen, a light source, and shadow figures), each place endowed it with individual characteristics. Introduced to Europe at the end of the Rococo period, shadow theatre has subsequently been adapted by various European artists to their own styles by experimenting with new material for the puppets, lighting techniques, and shadows produced by human bodies. Throughout history, the minimalistic nature of shadow theatre has appealed to the imagination of people of widely varying cultures. I believe that shadow play activities can benefit personal development. This idea has theoretical support from psychological and educational literature and practical support from my own work with elementary students. An exploration of the importance of play and make-believe, of puppets, and of shadows serves to illustrate the value of shadow play activities to the child's development.
dc.format.extentxi, 148 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subject.lccPN 1979 S5 C645 1987en
dc.subject.lcshShadow pantomimes and plays
dc.subject.lcshPuppets and puppet-plays
dc.subject.lcshTheater
dc.titleTowards a place for shadow play in creative drama
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/12914
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.nameMA
thesis.degree.disciplineCurriculum and Instruction
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccPN 1979 S5 C645 1987en
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesoffsiteen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 576 215772179


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.