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dc.contributor.advisorThompson, Dixon A. R.
dc.contributor.authorChisholm, Amanda B.
dc.coverage.spatial2000002009en
dc.coverage.spatial2000002010en
dc.coverage.spatial2000002011en
dc.coverage.spatial2000002012en
dc.date.accessioned2005-07-21T21:59:51Z
dc.date.available2005-07-21T21:59:51Z
dc.date.issued1988
dc.identifier.citationChisholm, A. B. (1988). Heavy metal contamination of fresh water: implications for pollution control policy (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/21189en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0315466952en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/23973
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 169-182.en
dc.description.abstractPersistent toxic substances have been identified as a problem in the aquatic environment because of their unique chemical characteristics. Heavy metals are a good example of persistent toxic substances. The presence of heavy metals in fresh water poses a threat to human health, the viability of certain industries, and the stability of aquatic ecosystems. This Master's Degree Project examines the ability of institutional frameworks to control the pollution of fresh water by heavy metals, given their unique characteristics as persistent toxic substances and their release from both point and non-point sources. The metals examined are cadmium, lead, and mercury. The institutional frameworks of the federal government and the provincial governments of Alberta, Manitoba, and Ontario are reviewed with respect to policy instruments and management approaches. This review is based on the issues identified from an examination of the chemical characteristics of cadmium, lead, and mercury in fresh water and aquatic ecosystems, and of the point and non-point sources of metals to the aquatic environment. The review identifies the following issues as important to the management of persistent toxic substances: a lack of policy specific to persistent toxic substances; limited ecosystem monitoring; misapplication of assimilative capacity; a need for zero discharge and ecosystem management approaches; and the need to integrate human health issues into water quality management frameworks.
dc.format.extentx, 182 leaves : Ill. ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subject.lccTD 427 H45 C44 1988en
dc.subject.lcshWater - Pollution - Research
dc.subject.lcshHeavy metals
dc.titleHeavy metal contamination of fresh water: implications for pollution control policy
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.facultyEnvironmental Design
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/21189
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Environmental Design
thesis.degree.nameMEDes
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccTD 427 H45 C44 1988en
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesoffsiteen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.