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dc.contributor.advisorLupart, Judith L.
dc.contributor.authorStott, Heather Allison
dc.coverage.spatial200000968en
dc.coverage.spatial200000969en
dc.coverage.spatial200000970en
dc.coverage.spatial200000971en
dc.date.accessioned2005-07-29T22:06:48Z
dc.date.available2005-07-29T22:06:48Z
dc.date.issued1995
dc.identifier.citationStott, H. A. (1995). Gifted children and their non-gifted siblings: self-concepts and sibling relationships (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/22484en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0612043282en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/29719
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 136-145.en
dc.description.abstractSelf-concepts and sibling relationships were examined in 80 elementary school students: 20 academically gifted children; 20 non-gifted siblings and; 40 control students utilizing the Self Perception Profile for Children (Harter, 1985) and the Sibling Relationships Questionnaire (Furman & Buhrmester, 1985). The study was predominantly exploratory in nature with two main purposes: to assess group differences in self-concepts and global self-esteem and; to explore group differences in perceptions of the sibling relationships. Gifted children were found to report greater Scholastic Competence and Global Self-Esteem compared to all groups, but reported poorer Athletic Competence than did their peers. Non-gifted siblings were found to report poorer Global Self-Esteem than their peers. Gifted children reported greater conflict within their sibling relationships and their non-gifted siblings reported less companionship compared to the control sibling dyads. Findings are discussed within the theoretical framework of labeling theory, Tesser's ( 1980) Self-Esteem Maintenance Model and Social Comparison Theory.
dc.format.extentx, 168 leaves ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subject.lccBF 723 S28 S76 1995en
dc.subject.lcshSelf-perception in children
dc.subject.lcshBrothers and sisters
dc.subject.lcshGifted children - Psychology
dc.titleGifted children and their non-gifted siblings: self-concepts and sibling relationships
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/22484
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
thesis.degree.nameMS
thesis.degree.nameMSc
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychology
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccBF 723 S28 S76 1995en
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesoffsiteen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 1004 520538314


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.