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dc.contributor.advisorNigg, Benno M.
dc.contributor.authorCole, Gerald Kenneth
dc.date.accessioned2005-07-29T22:13:59Z
dc.date.available2005-07-29T22:13:59Z
dc.date.issued1995
dc.identifier.citationCole, G. K. (1995). Loading of the joints of the lower extremities during the impact phase in running (Unpublished doctoral thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/11221en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0612041751en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/29880
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 188-202.en
dc.description.abstractThe main purpose of this study was to compare the sagittal plane loading (change in magnitude and rate of change) of the joints of the support leg during the impact phase in running to the vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) and to compare these loading characteristics between subjects using a direct dynamics simulation model of the musculoskeletal system. During development of the impact model, the modelling of force production in skeletal muscle was examined, as well as the influences of muscles, soft tissue movement, and foot inversion-eversion on the impact loading of the body. Evaluation of the model with respect to experimental measurements showed that it was able to predict the peak and average rate of change of the VGRF with mean error and standard deviation of 12.4 ± 7.8% and 16.2 ± 9.3%, respectively, for five subjects. In addition, the kinematics of each subject were well represented. The results of the study suggested that muscles generally increased the external loading, but not the loading of the joints. Soft tissue movement generally decreased the external loading and, hence, the internal loading. Foot inversion-eversion generally increased the time to the peak VGRF and, as a result, decreased the rate of loading both externally and internally. The precise influences varied between subjects. Animal experiments in which repetitive loading, similar to the vertical ground reaction force in running, has produced degenerative changes to articular cartilage suggest that runners may be at risk to the development of osteoarthritis. The two results of this study that (a) the loading in the joints of the lower extremities were always less than the external loading and (b) there was considerable variability in joint loading between subjects provide possible explanations why osteoarthritis is not generally observed in runners. A third alternative is also proposed based on adaptation of cartilage to mechanical load. The model developed in this study has the potential to assist in evaluating each of the above possibilities in runners. However, further evaluation of the assumptions and parameters used in the model is first required.en
dc.format.extentxxvii, 226 leaves ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subject.lccRC 1220 R8 C66 1995en
dc.subject.lcshRunning - Physiological aspects
dc.subject.lcshJoints - Physiology
dc.subject.lcshHuman mechanics
dc.titleLoading of the joints of the lower extremities during the impact phase in running
dc.typedoctoral thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/11221
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccRC 1220 R8 C66 1995en
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesoffsiteen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 966 520538276


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.