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dc.contributor.advisorZwirner, Walter W.
dc.contributor.authorEsber, Michael D.
dc.coverage.spatial200000288en
dc.date.accessioned2005-07-29T22:15:10Z
dc.date.available2005-07-29T22:15:10Z
dc.date.issued1995
dc.identifier.citationEsber, M. D. (1995). Using subordinate level word prime exemplars in an object classification task (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/19463en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0612042820en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/29905
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 141-150.en
dc.description.abstractResearch in human categorization has suggested that categorical hierarchies are created in memory. "Basic" categorizations were believed to develop prior to "subordinate" and "superordinate" categorizations of stimuli. Rosch (1976) indicated that basic level categorizations were always the first and fastest accessed and retrieved by subjects from memory. Tanaka and Taylor (1991) questioned this finding by showing that experts' preferred to access subordinate level categorizations from memory. This study was designed to use Rosch's (1976) "basic level" word prime taxonomy with a "subordinate exemplar" word prime taxonomy to determine whether "subordinate exemplar" word primes could attain reaction times comparable or faster than "basic level" word primes in a matching task. Also of interest was whether gender influenced reaction times in these taxonomies. The main findings were that (a) "subordinate exemplar" word primes had reaction times similar or faster than "basic level" word primes, and (b) gender differences in reaction times were present within both "basic level" and "subordinate exemplar" group classifications. Taken together, these results demonstrate that expertise and gender do have an effect on the primacy and use of basic level categorizations.en
dc.format.extentxx, 158 leaves ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subject.lccBF 723 C27 E63 1995en
dc.subject.lcshCategorization (Psychology) in children
dc.subject.lcshCognition in children
dc.titleUsing subordinate level word prime exemplars in an object classification task
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/19463
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
thesis.degree.nameMS
thesis.degree.nameMSc
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychology
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccBF 723 C27 E63 1995en
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesoffsiteen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 971 520538281


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.