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dc.contributor.advisorLevy, Richard M.
dc.contributor.authorStroick, Sharon M.
dc.coverage.spatial2000001328en
dc.date.accessioned2005-07-29T23:04:12Z
dc.date.available2005-07-29T23:04:12Z
dc.date.issued1994
dc.identifier.citationStroick, S. M. (1994). A new mandate for the Federation of Calgary Communities (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/20003en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0315994967en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/30368
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 109-115.en
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this Master's Degree Project was to study the Federation of Calgary Communities (FCC) in order to assess concerns raised about the FCC by The City of Calgary. A 1993 Calgary Parks & Recreation survey of 111 Calgary community associations identified lack of communication, ineffective representation and duplication of services as three problems the FCC must address by 1995 in order to receive future municipal funding. The primary objective of this thesis was to recommend changes to the Federation's operating structure that would address these concerns. Research undertaken included a case study of the FCC, a survey of Canadian community federations and a comparative evaluation of the FCC with respect to its Canadian counterparts. The FCC was found to function very well relative to other Canadian community association federations that were identified and surveyed. Recommendations developed to improve its operations were twofold. Incremental changes to the FCC's means of communicating with both its members and the public were suggested as was the adoption of a clear advocacy role. In addition, it was recommended that services provided by the FCC be limited to member community associations only as a means of providing an incentive for Federation membership. To address the City of Calgary's concerns about duplicated services, more radical changes were suggested. These included the development of a new mission statement, a restructuring of the FCC's mandate and suggestions for how the FCC could benefit from its proposed liberation from excessive municipal control. Although this document is an academic thesis, it is also intended to serve as a reference tool for people working with or for community association federations across Canada.
dc.format.extentxii, 143 leaves ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subject.lccHT 169 C22 C369 1994en
dc.subject.lcshCity planning - Alberta - Calgary
dc.subject.lcshRegional planning - Alberta - Calgary
dc.subject.lcshCommunity development, Urban - Alberta - Calgary
dc.titleA new mandate for the Federation of Calgary Communities
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.facultyEnvironmental Design
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/20003
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Environmental Design
thesis.degree.nameMEDes
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccHT 169 C22 C369 1994en
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesoffsiteen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 949 520538895


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.