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dc.contributor.advisorHenry, J. David
dc.contributor.authorKinley, Trevor Alston
dc.coverage.spatial200000623en
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-05T17:02:04Z
dc.date.available2005-08-05T17:02:04Z
dc.date.issued1992
dc.identifier.citationKinley, T. A. (1992). Ecology and management of bobcats (Lynx rufus) in the East Kootenay district of British Columbia (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/16958en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0315833009en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/31316
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 66-72.en
dc.description.abstractThe East Kootenay bobcat population represents one of the most northerly extensions of bobcat distribution. No previous studies of bobcats have been conducted in British Columbia. The East Kootenay Bobcat Project was initiated by the Wildlife Branch to serve as a base for reviewing current management decisions and developing future management policies for the East Kootenay district. I monitored seven radiocollared bobcats for periods of 24 to 353 days. Average total 100% minimum convex polygon home ranges for adult males were 123 km2. The only adult female had a range of 54 km2. Winter movements were restricted to narrow bands at low elevations, aligned parallel to the Rocky Mountain Trench. I estimated the population of the East Kootenay district using three methods, two based on winter movements of collared bobcats, and the other based on track observations. Averaging the three yielded a conservative estimate of 216 bobcats in the East Kootenay district. Examination of the carcasses and teeth of bobcats harvested from 1986/87 through 1990/91 indicated a preponderance of females in all age classes for both trapping and hunting. The overall male to female ratio was 0.65:1. Although the proportion of kittens, yearlings, and adults in the harvest sample varied widely between years, I did not detect a trend. Red squirrels were the most common winter prey for kittens. Preliminary indications are that the existing harvest is not depleting the population.en
dc.format.extentv, 78 leaves ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subject.lccQL 737 C23 K56 1992en
dc.subject.lcshLynx
dc.subject.lcshFelidae
dc.titleEcology and management of bobcats (Lynx rufus) in the East Kootenay district of British Columbia
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.facultyEnvironmental Design
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/16958
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Environmental Design
thesis.degree.nameMEDes
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccQL 737 C23 K56 1992en
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesoffsiteen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 826 520535210


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.