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dc.contributor.advisorHelmer, James W.
dc.contributor.authorVivian, Brian C.
dc.coverage.spatial2000003288en
dc.coverage.spatial2000003289en
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-05T17:03:46Z
dc.date.available2005-08-05T17:03:46Z
dc.date.issued1992
dc.identifier.citationVivian, B. C. (1992). Similkameen Valley prehistory: cultural interaction across the interior plateau of British Columbia and Washington State (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/18554en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0315752432en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/31352
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 135-148.en
dc.description.abstractArchaeological and anthropological studies of the Interior Plateau concur that the Fraser and Columbia Plateaux are generally distinct regions of cultural development within the broader scope of plateau culture. A review of the cultural historical sequences indicate obvious exchange of cultural traits between the Fraser and Columbia regions over the last 9,000 years. However, few studies have examined the process of interaction and the transmission of cultural traits across the Interior Plateau. Located between the Fraser and Columbia Plateaux, the Similkameen Valley forms a natural corridor between the two plateau regions. The Similkameen Valley is an excellent location to identify and characterize cultural interaction across the Interior Plateau. A comparison of five different landuse models against the ethnohistoric record of the Similkameen Valley indicates that the pattern of interaction falls within the Diffuse Cultural/Ecological Transition Model. This conclusion is compared to the archaeological data from the Similkameen Valley, as a means of establishing the temporal continuity of this pattern. Analysis of projectile point types and the distribution of lithic raw materials indicates prehistoric Similkameen Valley populations were predominantly influenced by, and interacted with, Columbia· Plateau populations. This contradicts the ethnohistoric record, and discredits the role of the Similkameen Valley as a natural corridor between the Fraser and Columbia Plateaux. This analysis suggests that the degree and intensity of interaction across the Interior Plateau is a direct reflection of population mobility and subsistence economy.
dc.format.extentxii, 154 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subject.lccE 71 V58 1992en
dc.subject.lcshArchaeology - British Columbia - Similkameen Valley
dc.subject.lcshArchaeology - Washington (State) - Similkameen Valley
dc.titleSimilkameen Valley prehistory: cultural interaction across the interior plateau of British Columbia and Washington State
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/18554
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.nameMA
thesis.degree.disciplineArchaeology
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccE 71 V58 1992en
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesoffsiteen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.