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dc.contributor.advisorMacFadyen, Alan J.
dc.contributor.authorRosnau, Lucas J. W.
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-08T19:25:14Z
dc.date.available2005-08-08T19:25:14Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.citationRosnau, L. J. (2002). Quantifying the preference intensities associated with physical tasks (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/14187en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0612761703en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/39352
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 194-198en
dc.description.abstractWhat can be inferred about a commuter's preferences over the physical tasks of walking, standing, and sitting using a hybrid of experimental and contingent valuation methodologies? This research addresses the question of whether there exists a valid and reliable dollar-measure of preference intensities for walking, standing, and sitting. Data was collected from over 100 participants; they participated in an experiment involving actual money tradeoffs and physical consequences (walking, standing, or sitting) for choices. The experiment is noteworthy for trying to distil a dollar-measure for preferences over tasks independent of the inherent time-costs associated with those tasks.
dc.format.extentix, 198 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subject.lccAC1 .T484 2002 R675en
dc.titleQuantifying the preference intensities associated with physical tasks
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/14187
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (MA)
thesis.degree.disciplineEconomics
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccAC1 .T484 2002 R675en
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesUARCen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 1402 501888795


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.