Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorKatzenberg, M. Anne
dc.contributor.authorVarney, Tamara L.
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-08T19:57:25Z
dc.date.available2005-08-08T19:57:25Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.citationVarney, T. L. (2003). Reconstructing diet and tracing life histories in colonial populations of the northeastern Caribbean using stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes (Unpublished doctoral thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/12902en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0612870065en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/39961
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 229-255en
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation uses stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis in conjunction with archaeological and historical evidence to reconstruction diet, and the trace of life histories of individuals in three colonial era (circa A.O. 1800) cemetery populations from three adjacent islands (Antigua, Guadeloupe and Montserrat) of the Northeastern Caribbean. The cemetery populations studied were excavated in response to disturbance by modern development or weather related erosion. Two of them are believed to be comprised largely of enslaved individuals of African origin and descent. The remaining cemetery population is of mixed origin including regular British Naval personnel of European origin as well as enslaved blacks of African origin and descent. The main purpose of this work is to establish isotopic signatures that represent the dietary habits of enslaved populations of the Northeastern Caribbean during the colonial era. The data reveal that while there are consistent similarities in terms of diet among the three populations that represent enslaved individuals, a large range of variability also exists. No significant differences in diet between the sexes were identified. The isotopic data is generally consistent with historic accounts of slave diet. The majority of individuals were consuming a diet that relied on a mix of C3 and C4 staple grains (maize and Guinea corn) and root crops (e.g., cassava, yams). The variability is attributed to the great diversity of geographic and cultural origins of the enslaved populations, as well as status differences among the three groups. The isotopic data indicate that the main dietary difference among the three groups is due to consumption of different protein sources (marine versus terrestrial). Life histories of 51 individuals from the three cemeteries were investigated using tooth and bone apatite. Comparison of the 813C values of the two tissues reveals that 21 individuals experienced a substantial change in diet from childhood to adulthood. The dietary changes were probably the result of their enforced immigration to the Caribbean from their birthplace in Africa. This is the first work to apply stable isotope analyses to questions of diet in the Caribbean during the historic period. Furthermore, it is the first attempt to trace life histories using stable isotope analyses of probable immigrant populations of the Caribbean.
dc.format.extentxvi, 268 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.titleReconstructing diet and tracing life histories in colonial populations of the northeastern Caribbean using stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes
dc.typedoctoral thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/12902
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.namePhD
thesis.degree.disciplineArchaeology
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccAC1 .T484 2003 V37en
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesUARCen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Embargoed until: 2200-01-01

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.