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dc.contributor.advisorMcMordie, Michael J.
dc.contributor.authorCoates, Lynn
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-16T16:53:43Z
dc.date.available2005-08-16T16:53:43Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationCoates, L. (2004). The architecture of human sustainability: interpreting the artness of complexity (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/11822en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/41415
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 178-181en
dc.description.abstractThis MDP investigates the associations between architecture's cultural significance and its technologically driven mandate of sustainable practice. It seeks to understand continuing perceptions of imbalance and disparity between the art and science of modern architecture and considers how this perception hinders the assessment of current sustainable practices across all domains. It endeavors to resolve this disparity by showing how the interpretation of cultural indicators can enhance the appreciation and assessment of sustainable architecture. An analytical framework is developed to facilitate the integration of architecture's cultural significance with other methods for assessing sustainability. The foundation of the framework establishes an inclusive, ethical context of human sustainability to evaluate architecture's mandate of technological and cultural sustainability. It builds on the current 'triple bottom line' paradigm of environmental, economic and social factors found in advanced sustainability frameworks across all domains. The comprehensive human sustainability framework is guided by awareness of thinking and behavior as a basis for the assessment of sustainable practice. It borrows strategies from management science, educational psychology, complexity theory and contemporary art to identify and assess the complex triple bottom line associations that are critical to sustainable practice and assessment across all domains. These strategies are used in the critical evaluation of architectural theories to show how awareness of thinking can enhance the integrated assessment of architecture as a technologically, culturally and ethically inclusive phenomenon. Key Words: assessment, aesthetics, alternative utterance, art coefficient, complexity, creative destruction, deontic paradigm, explicit, human sustainability, innovation, implicit, mediation, retrospective coherence, stakeholder, taciten
dc.format.extentvii, 181 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.titleThe architecture of human sustainability: interpreting the artness of complexity
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.facultyEnvironmental Design
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/11822
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Environmental Design
thesis.degree.nameMEDes
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesUARCen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 1495 520492012


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.