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dc.contributor.advisorLu, YouMing
dc.contributor.authorCochrane, Kimberley
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-16T16:53:46Z
dc.date.available2005-08-16T16:53:46Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationCochrane, K. (2004). The physical interaction of calcineurin with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits in rat hippocampus (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/15728en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0612975282en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/41416
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 75-92en
dc.description.abstractDuring long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) in the CAl region of the hippocampus, approximately 100 different proteins form a complex to modulate the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA) function. The physiological significance of these protein-protein interactions in synapses from the central nervous system is unclear. One of the proteins found in the NMDA receptor complex is calcineurin, which regulates NMDA receptor channel activity. To determine the cellular events underlying calcineurin regulation of NMDA receptors, I examined the physical interaction between calcineurin and the NMDA receptor in rat hippocampus. The results show that calcineurin was found in a complex that contained NMDA receptor subunits: NRl, NR2A, and NR2B and with postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95), suggesting that calcineurin physically interacts with the NMDA receptor subunits.en
dc.format.extentx, 92 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.titleThe physical interaction of calcineurin with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits in rat hippocampus
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/15728
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
thesis.degree.nameMS
thesis.degree.nameMSc
thesis.degree.disciplineNeuroscience
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccAC1 .T484 2004 C63en
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesUARCen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 1495 520492012


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.