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dc.contributor.advisorCleve, Richard E.
dc.contributor.authorAhokas, Graeme Robert
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-16T16:53:48Z
dc.date.available2005-08-16T16:53:48Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationAhokas, G. R. (2004). Improved algorithms for approximate quantum fourier transforms and sparse hamiltonian simulations (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/22839en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0612933458en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/41417
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 104-107en
dc.description.abstractWe investigate and improve algorithms for computing the approximate quantum Fourier transform (QFT ) and simulating a sparse Hamiltonian. We present an improved near-linear time algorithm for the approximate QFT modulo 2™. We give a circuit for the arbitrary modulus version that matches the best currently-known bound. We then relate the difficulty of the arbitrary modulus QFT to classical integer multiplication and division. We also investigate the problem of simulating an n-qubit sparse Hamiltonian. As input we receive the system's start state, a black box which, via queries, provides the non-zero entries of each row of the Hamiltonian, and a time t. We present an improved polynomial-time quantum algorithm for computing an approximation of the state of the system at time t. Prior to this, we provide an introduction to quantum computing, and survey some quantum algorithms that are used in our improved algorithms.en
dc.format.extentviii, 114 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.titleImproved algorithms for approximate quantum fourier transforms and sparse hamiltonian simulations
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/22839
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
thesis.degree.nameMS
thesis.degree.nameMSc
thesis.degree.disciplineComputer Science
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccAC1 .T484 2004 A46en
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesUARCen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 1484 520492001


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.