Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMorton, Frederick L.
dc.contributor.authorde Groot, David Alexander
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-16T16:54:59Z
dc.date.available2005-08-16T16:54:59Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationde Groot, D. A. (2004). Constitutional change in the post-Charlottetown decade: who won? who lost? (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/23733en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/41442
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 127-136en
dc.description.abstractSince the failure of the Charlottetown Accord, there is a widely accepted assumption that constitutional politics has ended. However, given the intensity of constitutional pressures preceding the Charlottetown Accord, it is unlikely that the actors involved would give up their constitutional ambitions. A more reasonable plausible is that these groups would seek out alternative forums to provide them with similar constitutional resources. As such, while macro-constitutional politics (formal amendments) was abandoned, through the processes of micro-constitutional politics Gudicial litigation) and quiet-constitutional politics (federal-provincial agreements and political conventions), the constitutional landscape of Canada has experienced widespread change. These changes are consistent with demands articulated by constitutional actors in the Charlottetown Accord. The post-Charlottetown decade, therefore, is more accurately characterized as a decade of alternative constitutional politics, rather than a decade without constitutional politics.en
dc.format.extentxi, 139 leaves ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.titleConstitutional change in the post-Charlottetown decade: who won? who lost?
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/23733
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (MA)
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Science
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesUARCen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 1497 520492014


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.