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dc.contributor.advisorTettey, Wisdom
dc.contributor.authorEizlini, Gaelle
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-16T16:57:01Z
dc.date.available2005-08-16T16:57:01Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationEizlini, G. (2004). African media during democratization: tracing media policy in Ghana and Zimbabwe (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/10873en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0612976890en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/41485
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 130-143en
dc.description.abstractIn Huntington's (1991) study of democratization, the press, or information media are barely mentioned, and the focus is on authoritarian control of the media, or how outside media influence a state's transition to democracy. Using a contingency model, and an understanding of the place of the media and media freedom from Mill and Habermas, this study will examine the media policies and legal instruments of two African states: Ghana and Zimbabwe. Examining current media policy (legal instruments, guarantees and state regulatory bodies) in Ghana and Zimbabwe offer interesting contrasts in their current attitudes towards the press and the kinds of press environments they are creating and how those affect democratization. Ghana has moved very aggressively to open media space which has created an environment of broad support for democracy. While in Zimbabwe, the Mugabe government has systematically targeted the independent media leading to a general reduction of the democratic impulse.en
dc.format.extentiv, 143 leaves ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.titleAfrican media during democratization: tracing media policy in Ghana and Zimbabwe
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/10873
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.nameMA
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunication and Culture
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccAC1 .T484 2004 E52en
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesUARCen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 1500 520492017


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.