The impact of peer-to-peer learning versus learning alone on measures of score, confidence and misconceptions within the adult disadvantaged population

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2004
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Abstract
The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of Peer-to-Peer Learning with Learning Alone on measures of Score, Confidence and Misconceptions among the disadvantaged adult population. At two different locations, an instructor taught three basic word processing workshops, all with the same content. Each workshop was randomly assigned to one of three measures: Peer-to-Peer, Individual, and No Intervention. Each student completed a Pre-Survey, Pre-Test, Lesson-Test (Peer-to-Peer and Individual intervention only), Post-Test, and Post-Survey. Two-way ANOVAs with one repeated measure were used to analyze Score, Confidence and Misconceptions. Previous research suggests that Peer-to-Peer Learning is far more effective than traditional classroom lectures. Results from this study support this theory in that the Peer­to-Peer students did significantly better on Performance than Individual treatment during intervention. However, this difference was not apparent during the retention test. Discussion centered on possible reasons for these findings and the implications on future research are provided.
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Bibliography: p. 128-139
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Citation
Kelly, P. W. (2004). The impact of peer-to-peer learning versus learning alone on measures of score, confidence and misconceptions within the adult disadvantaged population (Master's thesis, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada). Retrieved from https://prism.ucalgary.ca. doi:10.11575/PRISM/15883
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