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dc.contributor.advisorMcCallum, Pamela M.
dc.contributor.authorKennett, Paul J.
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-16T17:05:52Z
dc.date.available2005-08-16T17:05:52Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationKennett, P. J. (2004). Simulations of paternal signification in Bret Easton Ellis's "American Psycho" and Chuch Palahniuk's "Fight Club" (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/20568en_US
dc.identifier.isbn061297698Xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/41660
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 120-122en
dc.description.abstractThis thesis argues that the novels American Pscyho by Bret Easton Ellis and Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk present a vision of the late twentieth century West in which Oedipal paternal authority gives way in favour of a paternity of media and consumer culture. With reference to the writings of European psychoanalytic critic Slavoj Zizek, Jean Baudrillard's theories of simulacra and simulation, Christopher Lasch's writing on pathological narcissism, and Naomi Klein's writing on corporate branding, the thesis demonstrates that the resulting social climate represented by the novels is indeterminate for heterosexual males subjects. The metamorphosis of paternal signifiers into simulated signifiers result in male subjects without internalized authority. The novels ultimately dramatize an environment where the pathological narcissist has progressed from marginal affliction to a social norm.en
dc.format.extentv, 122 leaves ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.titleSimulations of paternal signification in Bret Easton Ellis's "American Psycho" and Chuch Palahniuk's "Fight Club"
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/20568
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.nameMA
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglish
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccAC1 .T484 2004 K438en
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesUARCen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 1511 520492028


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.