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dc.contributor.advisorHepple, Russell
dc.contributor.authorAshmead, Jon C.
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-16T17:06:30Z
dc.date.available2005-08-16T17:06:30Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationAshmead, J. C. (2004). Role of arterial PO2 and PCO2 in the regulation of brachial blood flow in humans (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/20823en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0612976270en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/41672
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 128-152en
dc.descriptionSome pages are in colour.en
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the role of arterial PO2 (PaO2) and PCO2 (PaCO2) in the regulation of brachial blood flow (BBF) in humans. Nine healthy male subjects participated in five 60-min experimental conditions: isocapnic hypoxia, isocapnic hyperoxia, euoxic hypocapnia, euoxic hypercapnia, and euoxia isocapnia (control). Dynamic end-tidal forcing was used to control end-tidal (i.e., arterial) PO2 and PCO2. Doppler ultrasound was used to measure BBF. Hypoxia elicited a sustained increase in BBF (25 ± 14%; P<0.05), whereas hyperoxia caused a sustained decrease in BBF (15 ± 8%; PO.05). Hypocapnia elicited a biphasic response, where BBF transiently increased (31 ± 17%; PO.05) after 2 min and abruptly declined (25 ± 14% below baseline) thereafter. During hypercapnia BBF initially increased (14 ± 10%; P<0.05), but returned to baseline values after 20 min. The present study provides direct evidence that alterations in PaO2 and PaCO2 have dynamic effects on blood flow regulation through the brachial artery. brachial blood flow, hypoxia, hyperoxia, hypocapnia, hypercapnia, euoxia, isocapniaen
dc.format.extentxvii, 202 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.titleRole of arterial PO2 and PCO2 in the regulation of brachial blood flow in humans
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.facultyKinesiology
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/20823
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
thesis.degree.nameMS
thesis.degree.nameMSc
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccAC1 .T484 2004 A77en
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesUARCen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 1487 520492004


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.