Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorHartman, Francis
dc.contributor.authorKrahn, Jennifer Lee
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-16T17:07:02Z
dc.date.available2005-08-16T17:07:02Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.citationKrahn, J. L. (2005). Project leadership: an empirical investigation (Unpublished doctoral thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/11407en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/41682
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 280-303en
dc.descriptionSome pages are in colour.en
dc.description.abstractThis thesis is concerned with effective project leadership. The main objective of this work is to support more effective project leadership by providing project managers with a stronger, more relevant and practical framework of key skills and competencies for specific project environments. Interest in project management has increased over the past several decades. Projects have become more prevalent and important within organizations and relied upon more heavily for organizational success; they have also become larger and more complex. These factors and others make projects more difficult to manage. At the same time, the effectiveness of the project manager is widely recognized as critical for project success, therefore it is essential to know which key skills and competencies are most important. Also, because projects can vary in terms of their characteristics and the work they require of the project manager to be successful, the required project manager skills and competencies may be very different for different projects. The research used three phases in the investigation. Phase 1, a Delphi Study, solicited the input of expert project professional about project manager skills, competencies, and project characteristics. Phase 2, focus groups, considered the potential fit of the project manager's work and the skills and competencies deemed most important from the perspective of the project manager and project sponsor. Phase 3, surveys, validated the findings from the prior research related to the importance of project manager skills and competencies and work. The results. of this investigation have provided new insight into key areas related to project manager effectiveness, revealing that the importance of project manager skills and competencies changes depending on the context in which the project is delivered. In general, "soft" skills and competencies are more often cited as very important than are "harder" or more technically focused skills and competencies. The research further showed discrepancy between the work of the project manager and the skills and competencies considered critical for them, as well as inconsistencies between the views of project managers and sponsors.
dc.format.extentxxi, 365 leaves ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.titleProject leadership: an empirical investigation
dc.typedoctoral thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/11407
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.namePhD
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesUARCen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 1586 520492103


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Embargoed until: 2200-01-01

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.