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dc.contributor.advisorWilson, Maureen G.
dc.contributor.authorKreitzer, Linda
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-16T17:07:15Z
dc.date.available2005-08-16T17:07:15Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationKreitzer, L. (2004). Indigenization of social work education and practice: a participatory action research project in Ghana (Unpublished doctoral thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/14076en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0612977498en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/41686
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 258-272en
dc.descriptionSome page are in colour.en
dc.description.abstractThe hegemony of western knowledge has influenced and continues to influence knowledge production throughout the world. Factors including colonialism, development under modernization and current neo-liberal globalization policies have helped to define knowledge production that promotes western thinking. Indigenous knowledge, for the most part, continues to be deemed primitive and unimportant. This hegemony is seen in the historical domination of Western social work knowledge worldwide and can be traced back to the colonial era. During the middle 20th century, social work education expanded to other non­western countries in an imperialistic fashion with the assumption that western social work knowledge, mainly North American and British, was universal and transferable. West Africa was influenced by this exportation of western social work knowledge, in particular, in Ghana. During the 1960s and 1970s, the Association of Social Work Education in Africa and the Ghana Association of Social Workers were active in promoting social work education and practice in that area. Over time, these organizations have lost their momentum and are perceived to have become ineffective. Western social work knowledge has continued its domination of social work education there. This study attempts to address the hegemony of western social work knowledge through a critical and emancipatory approach to knowledge production. Guided by Critical Theory and Participatory Action Research, it explores the processes of westernization and indigenization that have affected. Ghanaian society. Through a dialogical process, faculty, students, social workers and a community leader came together to create new knowledge concerning Ghanaian social work. Through this critical process, the group emerged with action plans that changed their situations personally and professionally. This new knowledge reflects a need for a greater profile of social work in Ghana, an organizational change in regards to the Ghana Association of Social Workers and a greater emphasis on the publication and use of indigenous writing in social work education. It is hoped that the new knowledge produced from this research will continue to evolve and will motivate and challenge social workers in Ghana to develop an innovative social work education and practice that will be relevant to the needs of Ghanaian society.en
dc.format.extentxi, 304 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.titleIndigenization of social work education and practice: a participatory action research project in Ghana
dc.typedoctoral thesis
dc.publisher.facultySocial Work
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/14076
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.namePhD
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccAC1 .T484 2004 K74en
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesUARCen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 1513 520492030


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.