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dc.contributor.advisorBarclay, Robert Malcolm Ruthven
dc.contributor.authorLuszcz, Tanya Maria Joanne
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-16T17:10:40Z
dc.date.available2005-08-16T17:10:40Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationLuszcz, T. M. (2004). Community structure and habitat use by forest-dwelling bats in southwestern British Columbia (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/20891en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0612933806en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/41749
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 141-156en
dc.description.abstractBat species diversity and distribution vary with climate and with behaviour of sexes and reproductive classes. Furthermore, a bat's ability to deal with habitat structural complexity is influenced by body size, wing morphology and echolocation-call structure. I examined factors influencing community structure and habitat use of forest-dwelling bats among forests of different biogeoclimatic ecosystem zones and ages in southwestern British Columbia, using mistnetting and ultrasonic detection. Species composition varied with ecosystem zone, but not consistently between sampling techniques. Both ecosystem zone and forest age influenced habitat use by Myotis species. Black cottonwood stands and lower elevation forests were important for foraging Myotis. Older forests were more important to foraging Myotis species than young and medium-aged forests; however, foraging bats strongly preferred riparian areas. Habitat use by species of large bats did not follow clear patterns among ecosystem zones or forest ages, and results suggest that they may avoid forest interiors.
dc.format.extentxv, 156 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.titleCommunity structure and habitat use by forest-dwelling bats in southwestern British Columbia
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/20891
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
thesis.degree.nameMS
thesis.degree.nameMSc
thesis.degree.disciplineBiological Sciences
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccAC1 .T484 2004 L87en
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesUARCen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 1519 520492036


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.