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dc.contributor.advisorSayers, Anthony
dc.contributor.authorMcCann, Jan-Michelle
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-16T17:12:27Z
dc.date.available2005-08-16T17:12:27Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.citationMcCann, J. (2005). MPs.ca : internet usage among federal parliamentarians (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/22187en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/41781
dc.descriptionBibliography : p. 97-100en
dc.descriptionCopyright Clearance Form: yen
dc.descriptionUARCen
dc.description.abstractThe use of new communication technologies by political elites has throughout history shaped their ultimate effects on existing systems of political communication. The Internet's vast potential to increase citizen engagement in Canada's policy-making process leads to the question of how Canada's political elites, our elected Members of Parliament, are choosing to make use of this technology. Data collected directly from the MPs of Canada's 3 ih Parliament suggests Internet usage among federal parliamentarians is high, with online communication choices shaped by a structure of incentives and disincentives affecting the MPs individual choice about Internet use. The result is that Canada's MPs are using the Internet in a relatively similar fashion regardless of demographic and partisan differences - our federal parliamentarians are adopting and adapting online communication tools that facilitate their traditional roles, while ignoring complex communication tools that might increase citizen engagement and thus increase the MP's individual political risk
dc.format.extentx, 121 leaves ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.titleMPs.ca : internet usage among federal parliamentarians
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/22187
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Science
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 1594 520492111


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.