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dc.contributor.advisorVickers, Joan Norma
dc.contributor.authorPittman, Daniel J.
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-16T17:18:48Z
dc.date.available2005-08-16T17:18:48Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationPittman, D. J. (2004). Gaze and motor control of ADHD adolescents and controls: the effects of temporal delays in goal parameter presentation (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/11715en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0612933954en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/41892
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 82-95en
dc.description.abstractThe gaze and motor performance of adolescent males with Attention-Deficit /Hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and age-matched controls was determined in a computer-based simulation of a table tennis task used previously by Rodrigues et al (2002) and Vickers et al (2002). The Temporal Processing Task (TPT) was developed using the same time parameters and included visual cues that indicated two target locations to which a served ball was to be returned. During the long duration (LD) condition, the target was illuminated so that two seconds was available to prepare and respond, while in the short duration (SD) condition only 450 ms was available. Similarly to Vickers et al, the ADHD group was less accurate than the control group, and they also had irregular arm velocity at contact. However, contrary to Vickers et al, no group differences were found for gaze frequency, or the onset or duration of the quiet eye period. New findings were also found in the TPT that were not present in the previous studies. Movement time onset was significantly earlier for the ADHD group during successful LD trials, and participants from both groups tended toward a centralized fixation that was not apparent in the real task. The TPT did not appear to place the same pursuit tracking demands on the participants as did the actual task. The results cast some doubt upon the ecologically validity of computer-based tasks for testing ADHD participants, and suggest that ADHD research, particularly that which involves gaze behaviors, be performed using tasks with high ecological validity. The differences between the real task and the TPT are examined, and the results are discussed relative to disinhibitory models, as well as the potential implications of computer-based activities for those with ADHD.en
dc.format.extentvii, 95 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.titleGaze and motor control of ADHD adolescents and controls: the effects of temporal delays in goal parameter presentation
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.facultyKinesiology
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/11715
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (MSc)
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccAC1 .T484 2004 P58en
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesUARCen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 1530 520492047


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.