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dc.contributor.advisorFleising, Usher
dc.contributor.authorBickford, Julia
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-16T17:28:22Z
dc.date.available2005-08-16T17:28:22Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationBickford, J. (2004). The intersecting social worlds of MRI scientists and MS clinicians (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/13485en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0612976777en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/42050
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 160-172en
dc.description.abstractDo basic scientists and clinicians represent two separate sub-cultures? In other words, if culture is defined from a cognitive perspective, do basic scientists and clinicians espouse similar beliefs and understandings about the objects and events in the world around them? What are the differences and similarities between scientists and clinicians? How do they relate to common objects? This research is a case study of basic scientists and clinicians working in the areas of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Multiple Sclerosis (MS) in a Western Canadian university hospital. Based on five months of qualitative and quantitative fieldwork, this study indicates that there are differences in how basic scientists and clinicians perceive five shared boundary objects: the MRI, the neurological patient, the CNS disease, neurological diagnosis, and the brain. This research also describes the social life of MRI as it passes through sub-cultures within a hospital organization.en
dc.format.extentxi, 180 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.titleThe intersecting social worlds of MRI scientists and MS clinicians
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/13485
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.nameMA
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropology
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccAC1 .T484 2004 B47en
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesUARCen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 1490 520492007


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.