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dc.contributor.advisorRyan, M. Cathryn
dc.contributor.advisorHutcheon, Ian E.
dc.contributor.authorCole, Jennifer Margaret
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-19T20:38:20Z
dc.date.available2005-08-19T20:38:20Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationCole, J. M. (2004). Arsenic in a village drinking water supply, Mexico (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/17320en_US
dc.identifier.isbn061297636Xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/42282
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 42-46en
dc.description.abstractInhabitants of Tlamacazapa, Mexico display toxic health effects related to arsenic and other metal exposure from well-derived drinking water. Dissolved arsenic concentrations reach 37 ug/L, exceeding the World Health Organization guideline of 10 ug/L. Stable isotope data (2H & 18O-H2O, 13C in DIC, 34S-SO4) indicate that precipitation is recharging the wells through the soil and shallow groundwater. Soil and rock analyses exhibit arsenic concentrations up to 110 and 26 mg/kg, respectively. Major ion concentrations indicate that sewage contamination is entering well water by transport through the thin soil and shallow groundwater. Sewage contamination is a result of open-air excretion by humans and free-roaming animals. Arsenic and sewage contaminant concentrations correlate strongly and the presence of sewage apparently promotes the release of arsenic from aquifer materials. It is likely that arsenic mobilization is the result of competition with phosphate and other sewage-derived anions for sorption sites.en
dc.format.extentviii, 52 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.titleArsenic in a village drinking water supply, Mexico
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/17320
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
thesis.degree.nameMS
thesis.degree.nameMSc
thesis.degree.disciplineGeology and Geophysics
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccAC1 .T484 2004 C65Aen
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesUARCen
ucalgary.thesis.additionalcopyAC1 .T484 2004 C65 (Gallagher)en
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.