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dc.contributor.advisorMoore, R. Gordon
dc.contributor.authorBennion, Douglas Brant
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-19T21:11:21Z
dc.date.available2005-08-19T21:11:21Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.citationBennion, D. B. (2003). Inproving well productivity by evaluating and reducing formation damage during overbalanced and underbalanced drilling operations (Unpublished doctoral thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/22720en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0612869695en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/42858
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 424-448en
dc.description.abstractFormation damage, causing a reduction in the permeability of a porous formation adjacent to a production/injection well, commonly occurs during drilling operations on a worldwide basis. This damage can fall into a number of categories (mechanical, chemical, biological) depending on the type of reservoir, drilling fluid and drilling practices used. This thesis provides a comprehensive overview of the wide range of different types of formation damage that can occur in various situations, and presents a detailed methodology for the screening and determination of which types of formation damage are most likely to impact well productivity or injectivity in a given situation. It also provides recommendations for the reduction of the impact of damage in these situations. Extensive discussion of the use of underbalanced drilling technology as a means to reduce formation damage during drilling operations is also presented. Some formation damage mechanisms, which this research has determined are unique to underbalanced drilling, are presented. A detailed screening protocol for evaluating whether underbalanced drilling is the most effective technology to use to reduce the impact of formation damage is also presented. It is shown that, in many cases, although superficially underbalanced drilling appears to be attractive, unless properly designed and executed, underbalanced operations may actually cause more damage and productivity/injectivity reduction than well-designed and executed conventional overbalanced technology in the same situation. The thesis provides a detailed flowsheet protocol for the rapid categorization and evaluation of drilling induced formation damage for various reservoir types and indicates the specific laboratory tests and procedures which should be followed in order to properly evaluate the severity of these damage mechanisms. Proper use of these procedures will allow a standardized evaluation procedure for the systematic evaluation and reduction of drilling induced formation damage in a wide variety of common drilling applications.
dc.format.extentxxxiii, 448 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subject.lccAC1 .T484 2003 B46en
dc.titleInproving well productivity by evaluating and reducing formation damage during overbalanced and underbalanced drilling operations
dc.typedoctoral thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/22720
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.namePhD
thesis.degree.disciplineChemical and Petroleum Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccAC1 .T484 2003 B46en
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesUARCen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 1422 520708857


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.