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dc.contributor.authorNault, Barrie R
dc.contributor.authorJeffers, Patrick
dc.contributor.authorMuhanna, Waleed A.
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-04T18:39:03Z
dc.date.available2016-01-04T18:39:03Z
dc.date.issued2008-11
dc.identifier.citationJeffers, P.I., Muhanna, W., and Nault B.R., "Information Technology and Process performance: An Empirical Investigation of the Interaction Between IT and Non-IT Resources," Decision Sciences, 39, 4 (November 2008), 703-735.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0011-7315
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/51033
dc.descriptionAuthors of articles published in Wiley journals are permitted to self-archive the submitted (preprint) version of the article at any time, and may self-archive the accepted (peer-reviewed) version after an embargo period. Link to publisher's version http://ezproxy.lib.ucalgary.ca/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=bth&AN=35641109&site=ehost-liveen_US
dc.description.abstractDrawing on the resource-based view, we propose a configurational perspective of how information technology (IT) assets and capabilities affect firm performance. Our premise is that IT assets and IT managerial capabilities are components in organizational design, and as such, their impact can only be understood by taking into consideration the interactions between those IT assets and capabilities and other non-IT components. We develop and test a model that assesses the impact of explicit and tacit IT resources by examining their interactions with two non-IT resources (open communication and business work practices). Our analysis of data collected from a sample of firms in the third-party logistics industry supports the proposed configurational perspective, showing that IT resources can either enhance (complement) or suppress (by substituting for) the effects of non-IT resources on process performance. More specifically, we find evidence of complementarities between shared business–IT knowledge and business work practice and between the scope of IT applications and an open communication culture in affecting the performance of the customer-service process; but there is evidence of substitutability between shared knowledge and open communications. For decision making, our results reinforce the need to account for all dimensions of possible interaction between IT and non-IT resources when evaluating IT investments.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen_US
dc.subjectInformation technologyen_US
dc.subjectCommunication & technologyen_US
dc.subjectThird-party logisticsen_US
dc.subjectCustomer servicesen_US
dc.subjectDecision makingen_US
dc.subjectSupply chain managementen_US
dc.subjectProduction planningen_US
dc.subjectOrganizational changeen_US
dc.subjectInformation resources managementen_US
dc.subjectFinancial performanceen_US
dc.subjectDecision theoryen_US
dc.subjectPerformanceen_US
dc.titleInformation Technology and Process Performance: An Empirical Investigation of the Interaction Between IT and Non-IT Resources.en_US
dc.typejournal article
dc.description.refereedYesen_US
dc.publisher.urlhttp://www.wiley.com.ezproxy.lib.ucalgary.ca/WileyCDA/en_US
dc.publisher.corporateUniversity of Calgaryen_US
dc.publisher.facultyHaskayne School of Businessen_US
dc.publisher.departmentManagement Information Systemsen_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/34185
thesis.degree.disciplineManagement Information Systemsen_US


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