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Recent Submissions

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Open Access
Interdisciplinary courses as spaces of reflection and exploration
(2024) Campbell, Éowyn; Gilbert, Brian; Sandblom, Nicole
Overview of the session and topic: Reflection is an essential part of course design that supports a wide variety of learners (McRae et al. 2018). Using the DEAL model (Ash and Clayton 2009, Loy et al. 2021) in F18, we developed activities where our students considered feedback about their writing in our interdisciplinary course. In our research project, we investigated the student experience with semi-structured conversational interviews. We will share our research findings surrounding these student perspectives. Our analysis revealed how reflection influenced their progress in self-assessing their writing process. We also noted that they describe developing skills that impacted their future learning and careers. Intent for the session: Participants will consider how receiving feedback from outside of their discipline can be important for students, will examine how accessible course design can influence life-long learning, and will discover how the findings may connect to their own teaching contexts. Brief overview of meaningful inclusion: In addition to the research presentation and handout, we will use an interactive platform (e.g. Padlet) to encourage reflection about our study. This resource provides an opportunity for the participants to actively engage in our session and serves as an artefact to reflect back and connect their own learning to that of others. They can connect their own learning to the learning of others. References Ash SL, Clayton PH. 2009. Generating, deepening, and documenting learning: The power of critical reflection in applied learning. Journal of Applied Learning in Higher Education. 1(1): 25-48. Loy K, Huh R, Snow J, Redmond A. 2021. Learning Module: Critical Reflection. Available from: https://taylorinstitute.ucalgary.ca/resources/module/critical-reflection [Accessed 12 January 2022]. McRae N, Pretti TJ, Church D. 2018. Work-Integrated Learning Quality Framework, AAA [White paper, PDF file]. Available from: https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-advancement-co-operative-education/sites/ca.centre-advancement-co-operative-education/files/ uploads/files/wil_quality_framework_-_aaa_-_for_posting.pdf [Accessed 27 January 2021].
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Open Access
Digitizing the Winnifred Eaton Reeve Fonds Project: Sometimes it Takes a Village
(2024-05-29) McKillop, Christena; Nisenson, Jason; Ruddock, Kathryn
The University of Calgary’s Archives and Special Collections houses the Winnifred Eaton Reeve archive, a popular collection for literary researchers investigating Winnifred Eaton Reeve, a pivotal early Chinese North American fiction-writer who assumed the Japanese persona “Onoto Watanna.” Winnifred Eaton Reeve (1875-1954) was a successful novelist in North America as well as a Hollywood editor, story and screenplay writer. This collection stands as the second most frequently consulted fonds in our literary archives. The inherent fragility of the artifacts mandated extreme caution during every interaction, underscoring the need for digitization to safeguard and enhance accessibility for present and future Winnifred Eaton Reeve enthusiasts. The rising demand for digital access from external academic researchers became the catalyst for a full-scale digitization project. This project was unique not only as it encompassed digitizing the entire collection but because a cross-departmental team was created to handle the project. The presenters will discuss how the complexities of a team approach for the digitization project – from retrieval, description, and handling of fragile materials to addressing metadata mapping, sensitive content, and navigating changes in the Canadian copyright act, substantially updating the finding aid and creating an online research guide drew upon a wide-range of information experts from across the library system. Insights from our first endeavor in digitizing an entire archival collection will be shared, offering lessons learned and future directions.
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Open Access
The Rhizodonts of Blue Beach, Nova Scotia, Canada (Horton Bluff Formation, Tournaisian Age): New Data on Letognathus hardingi, Other Genera Occurrences, and Their Phylogenetic Implications within the Devonian-Carboniferous Faunal Transition
(2024-05-28) Heusinkveld, Holly Tegan; Anderson, Jason Scott; Jamniczky, Heather; Theodor, Jessica Madeleine; Dutchak, Alex
Twenty-three Tournaisian-aged fossils from the Horton Bluff Formation of Blue Beach, Nova Scotia, Canada, were identified as consisting mainly of rhizodont material. Collected from the stratigraphic fossil hiatus “Romer’s Gap”, rhizodont specimens in the sample include humeri, skull bones, shoulder bones, a dermopalatine, and a portion of a braincase. The rhizodont genera identified were Letognathus, Strepsodus, and Rhizodus, which demonstrates a greater rhizodont diversity at Blue Beach than previously known. New morphological characters now identifiable to Letognathus from the sample include postparietals with an interdigitated interpostparietal suture, an ossified braincase, and a compact, semicircular humerus. Unlike the highly derived Strepsodus and Rhizodus, Letognathus displays a more equal mix of rhizodont characters that first appeared in Devonian genera and characters typical of derived Carboniferous genera. Letognathus shares the most in common with the Carboniferous genus Barameda, and is placed phylogenetically as a possible sister taxon to Barameda within the Rhizodontidae. The Strepsodus material from the sample consists of two examples of postparietals and a single humerus. The Rhizodus material consists of a scapulocoracoid. The possible cohabitation of Letognathus, Strepsodus, and Rhizodus at Blue Beach parallels the patterns of overlap previously found among Blue Beach actinopterygians and tetrapods, where related taxa with a greater number of ancestral Devonian characters overlapped taxa with more derived Carboniferous morphologies. This trend across families of closely related taxa with unique combinations of typical Devonian and Carboniferous morphologies overlapping in the Early Carboniferous argues against Romer’s initial proposal that the fossils of the layers composing Romer’s Gap would consist largely of intermediate forms between Devonian and Carboniferous morphologies.
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Open Access
(Virtual) Space for Change: Youth Activism on Twitter
(2024-05-27) Pauls, Monica; Adorjan, Michael; Nelson, Fiona; Bakardjieva, Maria; Steinberg, Shirley; Mendes, Kaitlynn
While there are many concerns about the harmful effects of social media use, particularly for young people, engagement in activism and social movements is an area where this form of technology can be particularly beneficial. Social media platforms facilitate new opportunities for political expression and mobilization, and allow young people to operate outside of traditional spaces of political engagement. However, activism that happens online looks quite different from that of previous generations and there is still much to learn about this phenomenon. This research explores the use of social media, specifically Twitter, among a small sample of youth activists, focusing not only on how these activists use Twitter for their work, but also considering the ways in which the platform influences and constructs what is happening online. A modified ethnographic approach was employed using Twitter as the field, which included interviews with youth activists, aged 14 to 24, in the international climate change movement and the American gun control movement. Samples of the participants’ Twitter feeds were also collected. The mixed methodological design allowed for a thematic analysis of the interviews in conjunction with the Twitter data, as well as a social network analysis of the sampled tweets. A social constructivist lens was employed, pulling from a combination of traditional and contemporary theories to further understand youth activism in light of social media. Findings provide insights into what it means to young people to do activism online. This contributes to a definition of activism that includes youth voice, appreciates the connection between online practices and activist identity and, above all else, furthers a counter-argument to critiques of digital activism. The analysis also contributes to our understanding of the relationship between human agency and technological control in virtual spaces by demonstrating the agency youth activists can enact online through their recognition of affordances, their engagement in strategic practices and their navigation of the risks of using social media. Finally, the data helps us reconsider our understanding of collective behaviour in light of social media, with a specific focus on relationships and connections among social movement actors online.
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Open Access
Sensitivity-enhanced Microwave Sensors for Real-time Detection and Monitoring
(2024-05-27) Vestrum, Sarah Viola; Abbasi, Zahra; Abbasi, Zahra; Murari, Kartikeya; Badv, Maryam
Planar microwave sensors have gained popularity due to their real-time, non-invasive sensing abilities. These structures have successfully enabled various range of applications in various applications, from small-volume liquid characterization in biomedical applications to sensing and detection in high-pressure and temperature environments. While planar resonator structures were introduced to the filter design domain first, they have transited into an ideal candidate for real-time sensing and monitoring to address different limitations that waveguide microwave sensing approaches suffer from, including bulky structures and requiring higher volumes of the sample under the test. This work focuses on enhancing the sensitivity of microwave structures using single-port reader-tag based structures. Unlike the popular two-port planar microwave sensor structures, single-port structure designs have the advantage of lowering the requirements and costs for measuring equipment, making them suitable for personalized sensing applications. Here, three single-port reader-tag based planar sensors have been introduced to enhance sensitivity and sensing distance for different rapid liquid characterization applications in the medical field. First, a patch antenna sensor for distant, small volume water-content detection. This structure detects water absorption with a resolution of 25 μL using a hydrogel-integrated sensing tag to improve sensitivity. Then, a patch antenna sensor for distant electrolyte concentration detection in urine for hydration monitoring was developed. The fabricated sensor was able to detect concentration changes of 0.5% at a distance of 24 mm from the reader, making it a well-fit candidate for wearable dehydration monitoring applications in older adults due to their increased susceptibility to dehydration.