PRISM | Institutional Repository

 

Recent Submissions

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Open Access
Shedding light on an important archive: digitizing the Winnifred Eaton Reeve fonds
(2024-06-14) McKillop, Christena; Nisenson, Jason; Ruddock, Kathryn
The Winnifred Eaton Reeve fonds, a significant collection in the literary archives at the University of Calgary, chronicles the works of Winnifred Eaton Reeve (1875-1954), a pivotal early Chinese North American fiction-writer who assumed the Japanese persona “Onoto Watanna.” This collection became the focal point of a comprehensive digitization project driven by substantial demand from academic researchers. This project was unique as it encompassed digitizing the entire collection. The session will include a brief overview of our first venture in digitizing an entire archival collection during a time of change. Attendees will learn about our approach to this digitization project and its multifaceted aspects that needed to be considered. The inherent fragility of the artifacts mandated extreme caution during every interaction, underscoring the need for digitization to safeguard and enhance accessibility for present and future Winnifred Eaton Reeve enthusiasts. Significant challenges and opportunities encountered during the project will be highlighted, including metadata mapping across disciplines, managing sensitive content, and adapting to unforeseen changes in the Canadian copyright landscape as well as substantially updating the finding aid and creating an online guide to increase access to the collection. With the successful completion of the digitization project, access collection either the physical or digital can be an effective way to raise awareness of this important Canadian author and generate new understandings through researching Winnifred Eaton Reeve’s life and works.
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Open Access
UCalgary Inclusive Map: Web Map, Data Typology, and Data Dictionary
(arcgic.com, 2024-05) Falahatkar, Hawjin; Fast, Victoria
Maps have historically served as powerful tools for understanding spatial relationships and aided in communication, navigation, and informed decision-making. However, conventional mapping processes often overlook the diverse needs of marginalized groups, resulting in a digital divide and less inclusive maps that perpetuate inequalities in the real world. By redefining mapping processes to ensure that maps reflect the spatial behavioral distinctions and needs of all individuals, we can empower less-represented groups to make informed spatial decisions. Focusing on needs of women and those with reduced mobility, maps of urban public spaces play a pivotal role in conveying essential information about spatial features relevant to these groups' navigation and use of space. "UCalgary Inclusive Map" is designed based on an innovative Feminist GIS framework that bridges this socio-spatial gap by combining multidisciplinary ideas from feminism, urban design, accessibility research, and GIS functionalities. This map includes features and attributes representing micro-amenities within the University of Calgary's campus open spaces that influence campus accessibility, safety, diversity, and spatial awareness for everyone.
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Open Access
Machine Learning Framework to Reduce Patient-Reported Dysphagia in Head and Neck Radiotherapy
(2024-06-13) Paetkau, D. Owen; Kirkby, Charles; Tchistiakova, Ekaterina; Gomes da Rocha, Claudia; Quon, Harvey Charles; Shinkel, Colleen Gayle
Radiotherapy treatment has become more effective in the 21st century due to advancements in treatment technologies such as image-guided radiotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy. Machine learning algorithms can provide advanced analytics based on the clinical, imaging, and dosimetric data available through radiotherapy treatments. Head and neck tumours are a site of specific interest, as these tumours often lie near many organs at risk which may cause radiation-induced acute or late toxicities while damaging the tumour. Among these organs are the muscles involved in the swallowing process that may cause dysphagia, or difficulty swallowing, after treatment. In this work, we investigated factors correlated with late dysphagia evaluated using patient-reported outcomes, with the goal of reducing this significant toxicity after head and neck radiotherapy. We examined anatomical changes to the pharyngeal constrictor muscles hypothesized to be correlated with dysphagia or cause significant dosimetric changes outside the random error associated with radiotherapy treatments. We found a significant increase in pharyngeal constrictors thickness and identified high dose gradients were closer to the pharyngeal constrictors in patients with dysphagia. Both features may be useful for identifying patients at risk of late patient-reported dysphagia. We then examined treatment planning dose constraints used to develop radiotherapy treatment plans. The mean dose constraints currently used within the literature did not classify patients well into the patient-reported symptom groups. Metrics were identified for the pharyngeal constrictor muscles and their substructures. The results suggest additional dose constraints to the pharyngeal constrictor muscles could reduce late patient-reported dysphagia. The final study examined advanced imaging features to develop predictive machine learning models for late patient-reported dysphagia. Current models used by speech language pathologists are limited to acute models. We successfully created models to predict late patient-reported dysphagia with sufficient accuracy and sensitivity, which may improve the identification and follow-up of patients at risk. Through this work, we were able to create recommendations based on several forms of intervention: adaptive planning, treatment planning, and predictive modelling. Further work, including prospective studies, may be required prior to clinical implementation of treatment planning or predictive modelling recommendations.
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Open Access
Consequences of Adolescent Sport-Related Concussion and Musculoskeletal Injury: Examining Long-term Impacts on Body Composition and Physical Activity Levels
(2024-06-11) Leggett, Benjamin T; Emery, Carolyn A; Schneider, Kathryn J; Smirl, Jonathan D; Eliason, Paul
Sport-related concussions (SRC) may be encumbering injuries and are experienced in high rates amongst Canadian adolescents participating in sport. Little is known of the long-term effects of SRC in how they may affect both physical activity behaviors and body composition as adults later in life. This thesis examined appropriate algorithms to employ when utilizing Actigraphs as objective measures of free-living physical activity behaviors, and then the body composition levels and physical activity levels of adults (ages 18-33) with a 5–15-year history of either SRC or musculoskeletal (MSK) injury relative to uninjured controls (UC). Data were collected for 268 individuals participating through the SHRed Consequences of Concussion cohort study. Analyses displayed that SRC and MSK injury cohorts relative to UC had comparable body compositions, identified through lean mass and fat mass indices, as well as comparable physical activity behaviors, denoted by daily amounts of sedentary time and light, moderate, moderate-to-vigorous, and vigorous physical activity. This demonstrated that those with adolescent SRC or MSK injury history continue to participate in physically active lifestyles as young adults as evidenced by either maintaining and/or acquiring body compositions and participating in physical activities similar to those without injury history. Future research should take a more granular look at long-term sport-related injury through examining persistent concussion symptoms for those with SRC history as well as type/location of MSK injury in an effort to consider the heterogeneity of these injuries.
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Embargo
Care for Older Adults Living with Dementia in the Emergency Department: Informing the Development of a Clinical Care Pathway
(2024-06-11) Jelinski, Dana Christine; Goodarzi, Zahra; Holroyd-Leduc, Jayna; Reich, Krista; Lang, Eddy
Background: People living with dementia (PLWD) are frequent users of the emergency department (ED). PLWD experience adverse outcomes in the ED at higher rates than older adults without dementia, and care partners play a vital role in supporting them. While there is some evidence that exists regarding best practices in caring for PLWD in the ED, there are gaps in evidence on the experiences of caring for PLWD in ED and implementing best practices from the view of healthcare providers (HCPs). Objectives: The objectives of this thesis were to (1) synthesize barriers and facilitators to care for PLWD in the ED through the perspective of care partners as well as HCP perceptions of care partner roles within the ED, and (2) explore barriers and facilitators to care through the perspective of HCPs. Methods: A systematic review and meta-synthesis were conducted following the Joanna Briggs Institute Manual for Evidence Synthesis to synthesize care partner perspectives and roles regarding care for PLWD in the ED. Semi-structured interviews with HCPs were used to directly understand experiences in caring for PLWD in the ED. Results: Care partners and HCPs reported similar barriers and facilitators to care for PLWD in the ED. Key barriers to care included gaps in primary care, the ED environment, and lack of dementia specific guidance and training. Key facilitators included the importance of care partner and patient involvement, and communication and collaboration among care teams. Conclusion: The findings of this study inform the development of interventions that target behavior change and promote dementia friendly EDs. Key implications highlighted in this study include education and training, staffing and environmental changes, and care guidance and policy implementation.