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dc.contributor.advisorHawkins, Richard
dc.contributor.authorRoss, Terry
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-02T14:44:39Z
dc.date.available2017-05-02T14:44:39Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.date.submitted2017en
dc.identifier.citationRoss, T. (2017). Innovation Agencies in a Resource Based Economy The Case of Alberta: Leadership, Energy, and Innovation (Unpublished doctoral thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/26537en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11023/3806
dc.description.abstractThere are government created organizations with a mandate to affect the sub- national system of innovation. These ‘innovation agency’ organizations provide functionality that enables additional innovation activity; this functionality may be delivered by organizations external to the innovation agency. The Alberta Oil Sands Science and Research Authority (AOSTRA), Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research (AHFMR), and the Alberta Informatics Circle of Research Excellence (iCORE) are three innovation agencies that exemplify significant innovation policy investments by the Alberta government. This thesis uses historical analysis and case studies to examine these three innovation agencies. The historical analysis examines Alberta’s complex coevolution of institutions, policy leadership and technically challenging natural resources that set the stage for these innovation agencies to emerge. Case study techniques are used to explore the emergence, operations, and impact of the innovation agencies. The findings are then positioned in the system of innovation literature. It was found that the Alberta system of innovation was highly influenced by institutional control over natural resources and that the oil sands were particularly important, given their value and the scientific challenges that they presented. Peter Lougheed’s role in entrepreneurially shaping institutions was a contingency for the emergence of the cases. It was found that the innovation agencies generally acted to subsidize research activity in other organizations, although there were significant exceptions (e.g. AOSTRA’s IP policy and Underground Test Facilities). Finally, the instrumentality of the organizations was significant, leading to development and adoption of technological systems by industry and enhanced research capabilities at Alberta universities.en_US
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subjectEducation--Business
dc.subjectEducation--Technology
dc.subjectCanadian Studies
dc.subjectEconomics--Commerce-Business
dc.subjectEconomics--History
dc.subjectEconomics--Theory
dc.subjectHistory--Canadian
dc.subjectPublic Administration
dc.subject.otherInnovation
dc.subject.otherAOSTRA
dc.subject.otherAHFMR
dc.subject.otheriCORE
dc.subject.otherLougheed
dc.subject.otherSystems of Innovation
dc.subject.otherAgencies
dc.subject.otherAlberta
dc.titleInnovation Agencies in a Resource Based Economy The Case of Alberta: Leadership, Energy, and Innovation
dc.typedoctoral thesis
dc.publisher.facultyGraduate Studies
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/26537
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.namePhD
thesis.degree.disciplineInterdisciplinary Graduate Program
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
atmire.migration.oldid5579
dc.contributor.committeememberHolbrook, Adam
dc.contributor.committeememberDeWald, Jim
dc.contributor.committeememberMansell, Robert
dc.contributor.committeememberLangford, Cooper
dc.contributor.committeememberFritzler, Marvin
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.